Researchers determine the best strategy for preventing ulcers when taking NSAIDs

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)—including ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen and others—are commonly used pain medications that are generally safe but may increase the risk of developing stomach and intestinal ulcers.

After researchers analyzed a large number of that compared different ways of reducing these risks of NSAIDs, they found that the best strategy with the lowest overall risk was to combine a certain type of NSAID, known as a COX-2-selective NSAID, with a (PPI). PPIs are most often used to treat heartburn and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

"The combination of a COX-2-selective NSAID with a PPI will be expensive and is not recommended for all patients who need to be on a NSAID; however, it is the safest and most effective treatment strategy for those at high risk of ulcer bleeding from NSAID treatment," said Prof. Jin Ling Tang, co-author of the Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics study.


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More information: J.Q.Yuan, et al. Systematic review with network meta-analysis: comparative effectiveness and safety of strategies for preventing NSAID-associated gastrointestinal toxicity. DOI: 10.1111/apt.13642
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Citation: Researchers determine the best strategy for preventing ulcers when taking NSAIDs (2016, May 13) retrieved 19 May 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-05-strategy-ulcers-nsaids.html
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May 13, 2016
It seems to me that taking neither would be more of a benefit than taking both. NOSH Aspirin needs to finish it's trial and hurry to market. NOSH Aspirin will be the best! PPI's are horrible!

Jun 13, 2016
I was recently reminded of zinc carnosine, a gastrointestinal protector. It may be worthy of some exploration and may help.

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