Metformin linked to increased risk of acute dialysis in T2DM

Metformin linked to increased risk of acute dialysis in T2DM

(HealthDay)—For patients with type 2 diabetes, metformin is associated with about a 50 percent increase in the risk of acute dialysis compared to sulfonylureas, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

Nicholas Carlson, M.D., from Copenhagen University in Denmark, and colleagues conducted a retrospective nationwide cohort study involving 168,443 drug-naive patients with type 2 diabetes aged 50 years and older. Participants initiated treatment with or sulfonylurea between 2000 and 2012 (70.7 percent initiated treatment with metformin).

The researchers found that the one-year risk for acute dialysis was 92.4 per 100,000 for sulfonylurea and 142.7 per 100,000 for metformin. The one-year risk of acute dialysis associated with metformin was increased by 50.3 per 100,000 (risk ratio, 1.53; number needed to harm, 1,988).

"In a retrospective nationwide cohort study on the risk of acute dialysis associated with initiation of metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes, treatment with metformin was associated with a 50 percent increase in risk of acute dialysis compared with sulfonylurea," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed to the .


Explore further

Greater drop in hemoglobin A1c with empagliflozin plus metformin

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2016 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Citation: Metformin linked to increased risk of acute dialysis in T2DM (2016, August 23) retrieved 16 September 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-08-metformin-linked-acute-dialysis-t2dm.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
74 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Aug 24, 2016
Great. So we're basically screwed, no matter which medicine we take.

Aug 24, 2016
fredaruf1960 - think you are confusing daily blood sugar readings, (over 100 is not good) with the A1C test done about every three months. Over 7% is bad - doctors usually are happy with 6.5%. My AM blood sugar readings are usually between 111 and 134. My A1C is running 6.6.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more