Depression in caregivers of dementia patients, worse for daughters or daughters-in-law?

October 13, 2016, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Too often overlooked is the risk of depression in caregivers of patients with dementia, and a new study focuses on how depressive symptoms may differ depending on the familial relationship between caregiver and patient. The study shows how patients' behavioral symptoms are predictive of depression to different extents when the caregiver is the patient's daughter versus daughter-in-law, as reported in Journal of Women's Health.

In Asian societies, a daughter-in-law often takes on the caretaker role, rather than a spouse or child, note Juwon Lee, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Bo Kyung Sohn, MD, Sujeong Seong, MD, and Jun-Young Lee, MD, PhD, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Hyunjoo Lee, Daegu University, Gyeongsan, and Soowon Park, PhD, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea, coauthors of the article "Impact of Behavioral Symptoms in Dementia Patients on Depression in Daughter and Daughter-in-Law Caregivers." In both groups of caregivers, increased as the frequency and severity of a patient's rose. But the level of depression was more strongly affected among one group of caregivers than the other, which the authors attribute to the relationship between patient and caregiver.

"This novel look at how factors such as relationship to the patient can affect caregiver depression offers valuable insights to help guide future studies and interventions aimed at understanding and safeguarding caregiver health," says Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Women's Health, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health.

Explore further: Caregiver well-being linked to quality of cancer patient care

More information: Juwon Lee et al, Impact of Behavioral Symptoms in Dementia Patients on Depression in Daughter and Daughter-in-Law Caregivers, Journal of Women's Health (2016). DOI: 10.1089/jwh.2016.5831

Related Stories

Caregiver well-being linked to quality of cancer patient care

August 30, 2016
(HealthDay)—Informal caregiver well-being is associated with patient-perceived quality of care (QOC), according to a study published online Aug. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Same factors influence depression in stroke patients, spouse caregivers

February 6, 2013
Self-esteem, optimism and perceived control influence depression in stroke survivors and their spouse caregivers—who should be treated together, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International ...

New study links risk factors to variations in postpartum depression

August 3, 2016
A new study shows that depression following childbirth can begin at different times and follow multiple distinct trajectories, emphasizing the need for clinicians to monitor for signs of postpartum depression and be aware ...

Even mild depression puts a burden on Alzheimer's family caregivers

September 21, 2015
Caregiving for an Alzheimer's patient is especially burdensome for spousal and family caregivers who at the time of their near and dear one's Alzheimer's diagnosis suffer from depressive symptoms, according to a recent University ...

Caregivers of those with dementia may benefit from tailored interventions

July 18, 2013
Rhode Island Hospital researchers have found that multiple factors contribute to the burden felt by caregivers of people living with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. These factors include the direct impact of providing ...

Caregivers of ICU survivors at high risk of developing depression, emotional distress

May 11, 2016
A new Canadian study focusing on caregiver outcomes of critically ill patients reveals that caregivers of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors, who have received mechanical ventilation for a minimum of seven days, are at a ...

Recommended for you

When scientists push people to their tipping point

December 10, 2018
You probably overestimate just how far someone can push you before you reach your tipping point, new research suggests.

Internet therapy apps reduce depression symptoms, study finds

December 7, 2018
In a sweeping new study, Indiana University psychologists have found that a series of self-guided, internet-based therapy platforms effectively reduce depression.

Gender bias sways how we perceive competence in faces

December 7, 2018
Faces that are seen as competent are also perceived as more masculine, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Targeted cognitive training benefits patients with severe schizophrenia

December 7, 2018
Schizophrenia is among the most difficult mental illnesses to treat, in part because it is characterized by a wide range of dysfunction, from hallucinations and mood disorders to cognitive impairment, especially verbal and ...

Pot withdrawal eased for dependent users

December 6, 2018
A new drug can help people diagnosed with cannabis use disorder reduce withdrawal symptoms and marijuana use, a new Yale-led study published Dec. 6 in the journal Lancet Psychiatry shows.

Link between neonatal vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia confirmed

December 6, 2018
Newborns with vitamin D deficiency have an increased risk of schizophrenia later in life, a team of Australian and Danish researchers has reported.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.