Scientists discover way to make milk chocolate have dark chocolate health benefits

October 28, 2016, Institute of Food Technologists
Chocolate
Chocolate. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Dark chocolate can be a source of antioxidants in the diet, but many consumers dislike the bitter flavor. The taste of milk chocolate is more appealing to a greater number of consumers, but it doesn't have the same antioxidants properties as dark chocolate. In a recent Journal of Food Science study, researchers found a way to use peanut skin extracts to make milk chocolate that has even more nutritional benefits of dark chocolate without affecting the taste.

Researchers from the Department of Food, Bioprocessing, and Nutrition Sciences at North Carolina State University extracted phenolic compounds from peanut skins, a waste product of , and encapsulated them into maltodextrin powder which is an edible carbohydrate with a slightly sweet flavor that comes from starchy foods such as potatoes, rice or wheat. The maltodextrin powder was incorporated into the .

Consumer testing of 80 subjects who compared samples of both milk chocolates with peanut extracts and without showed that the fortified chocolates were liked as well as the untreated milk chocolate. These tests also showed that the threshold for detecting the presence of the peanut skin extract was higher than that needed to fortify the milk chocolate to antioxidant levels comparable to .

Because peanut skins are a of the blanching process of the peanut industry, the authors say that including these extracts would allow for a value-added use of the discarded skins.

"If applied to commercial products, peanut skin extracts would allow consumers to enjoy mild tasting products and have exposure to compounds that have proven health benefits," lead author Lisa L. Dean explained.

The researchers noted that peanut allergenicity was not investigated, but that work is now ongoing.

Explore further: Milk allergy? Watch the dark chocolate

More information: L.L. Dean et al. Minimizing the Negative Flavor Attributes and Evaluating Consumer Acceptance of Chocolate Fortified with Peanut Skin Extracts, Journal of Food Science (2016). DOI: 10.1111/1750-3841.13533

Related Stories

Milk allergy? Watch the dark chocolate

February 11, 2015
Does your sweetheart have a milk allergy? You may want to hold off on a dark chocolate Valentine.

Myths and facts about chocolate from a nutrition professor

January 21, 2015
With Valentine's Day just around the corner, does chocolate appeal to you for its flavor, symbolic meaning of love or potential health benefits? Dr. Judith Rodriguez, a nutrition professor and chair of the Department of Nutrition ...

Keeping peanut skins in the mix boosts nutrition, researchers find

November 2, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Peanuts taste good and are good for you. But a new NC State study shows that putting a bit of skin in the game can make peanut products even healthier while keeping them flavorful.

Recommended for you

Human immune 'trigger' map paves way for better treatments

June 21, 2018
A discovery about how human cells are 'triggered' to undergo an inflammatory type of cell death could have implications for treating cancer, stroke and tissue injury, and immune disorders.

Fetal T cells are first responders to infection in adults

June 20, 2018
Cornell University researchers have discovered there is a division of labor among immune cells that fight invading pathogens in the body.

How a thieving transcription factor dominates the genome

June 20, 2018
One powerful DNA-binding protein, the transcription factor PU.1, steals away other transcription factors and recruits them for its own purposes, effectively dominating gene regulation in developing immune cells, according ...

Severe stress may send immune system into overdrive

June 19, 2018
(HealthDay)—Trauma or intense stress may up your odds of developing an autoimmune disease, a new study suggests.

Composition of complex sugars in breast milk may prevent future food allergies

June 12, 2018
The unique composition of a mother's breastmilk may help to reduce food sensitization in her infant, report researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine with colleagues in Canada.

Drug may quell deadly immune response when trauma spills the contents of our cells' powerhouses

June 11, 2018
When trauma spills the contents of our cell powerhouses, it can evoke a potentially deadly immune response much like a severe bacterial infection.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

NIPSZX
not rated yet Oct 30, 2016
Cool

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.