Study shows significant cost savings with a home-based palliative care program

October 18, 2016

A home-based palliative care (HBPC) program for individuals with advanced illnesses was associated with a $12,000 reduction in the mean total cost of care per person, fewer hospital admissions and emergency room visits, and greater use of hospice during the final three months of life, as reported in a study published in Journal of Palliative Medicine.

In the article entitled "The Impact of a Home-Based Palliative Care Program in an Accountable Care Organization," Dana Lustbader, MD and coauthors from ProHEALTH Care—An Optum Company and ProHEALTH Medical Management (Lake Success, NY), Optum Center for Palliative and Supportive Care (Eden Prairie, MN), and OptumCare (Phoenix, AZ), describe a HBPC program that was implemented within an Accountable Care Organization of a Medicare Shared Savings Program. The retrospective study compared individuals enrolled in the HBPC program to those receiving usual care.

An HBPC team included registered nurses, social workers, doctors, and administrative staff, each with strong clinical skills in palliative care. Care included home visits, telephone calls, and access to telepalliative care, in which patients and caregivers could interact virtually with any member of the team using a smart phone or computer.

"This is strong evidence that home-based palliative care delivers on the value equation—improved quality at lower cost," says Charles F. von Gunten, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Palliative Medicine and Vice President, Medical Affairs, Hospice and Palliative Medicine for the OhioHealth system.

Explore further: Study shows inpatient palliative care reduces hospital costs and readmissions

More information: Dana Lustbader et al, The Impact of a Home-Based Palliative Care Program in an Accountable Care Organization, Journal of Palliative Medicine (2016). DOI: 10.1089/jpm.2016.0265

Related Stories

Study shows inpatient palliative care reduces hospital costs and readmissions

October 16, 2014
Palliative care provided in the hospital offers known clinical benefits, and a new study shows that inpatient palliative care can also significantly lower the cost of hospitalization and the rate of readmissions. Further, ...

Most hospital palliative care programs are understaffed

October 5, 2016
Most hospitals offer palliative care services that help people with serious illnesses manage their pain and other symptoms and make decisions about their treatment, while providing emotional support and assistance in navigating ...

Some cancer center staff uncertain of services offered

September 21, 2016
(HealthDay)—Staff members at nearly one in 10 major U.S. cancer centers—all of which provide palliative care services—weren't certain such symptom-management and supportive care was actually available there, according ...

Major changes needed to improve palliative care in Canada

August 22, 2016
Canada's approach to palliative care must be broadened to offer support to people with serious chronic illnesses other than cancer, states an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Access to palliative care in US hospitals still not universal

October 1, 2015
Despite rapid expansion in hospital palliative care programs in the U.S., access to these programs nationwide varies across geographic regions and depends on factors such as hospital size and tax status, according to a new ...

Study finds one in five children who might benefit from pediatric palliative care do not

October 13, 2016
The University of Toronto's Faculty of Nursing today announced that only 18 per cent of children with life-threatening conditions access specialized pediatric palliative care in Canada, a 13 per cent increase since 2002. ...

Recommended for you

Amber-tinted glasses may provide relief for insomnia

December 15, 2017
How do you unwind before bedtime? If your answer involves Facebook and Netflix, you are actively reducing your chance of a good night's sleep. And you are not alone: 90 percent of Americans use light-emitting electronic devices, ...

Warning labels can help reduce soda consumption and obesity, new study suggests

December 15, 2017
Labels that warn people about the risks of drinking soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages can lower obesity and overweight prevalence, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.

Office work can be a pain in the neck

December 15, 2017
Neck pain is a common condition among office workers, but regular workplace exercises can prevent and reduce it, a University of Queensland study has found.

Regular takeaways linked to kids' heart disease and diabetes risk factors

December 14, 2017
Kids who regularly eat take-away meals may be boosting their risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Simulation model finds Cure Violence program and targeted policing curb urban violence

December 14, 2017
When communities and police work together to deter urban violence, they can achieve better outcomes with fewer resources than when each works in isolation, a simulation model created by researchers at the UC Davis Violence ...

Your pets can't put your aging on 'paws'

December 14, 2017
(HealthDay)—In a finding that's sure to ruffle some fur and feathers, scientists report that having a pet doesn't fend off age-related declines in physical or mental health.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.