Vitamin D doesn't improve glucose measures

October 5, 2016

(HealthDay)—Weekly doses of vitamin D do not improve oral glucose tolerance or markers of glycemic status among those at risk for diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

Tracy S. Moreira-Lucas, Ph.D., from the University of Toronto, and colleagues conducted a 24-week randomized, placebo-controlled trial to study the effect of 28,000 IU of vitamin D3 once weekly on after a two-hour, 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (2hrPC glucose); ; and beta-cell function. Of 71 participants with serum 5-hydroxyvitamin-D (25[OH]D) ≤65 nmol/L, impaired fasting glucose, and elevated glycated hemoglobin, 35 subjects received vitamin D and 36 received placebo.

The researchers found that serum 25(OH)D significantly increased in the vitamin D group. However, no significant differences in fasting or 2hPC glucose or other indices of , including beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity, were seen. The results were similar in a subgroup analysis of individuals with 25(OH)D <50nmol/L and prediabetes. The vitamin D group did show a significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

"Weekly doses of vitamin D3 in individuals with sub-optimal vitamin D and at risk for type 2 diabetes did not improve or markers of glycemic status," the authors write.

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RMQ
not rated yet Oct 05, 2016
I wonder what is the "logic" of physicians that leads them to give people mega doses of a supplement? It has been done several times with vitamin D and always the conclusion is obviously that it does not work, even that is bad for people.

One day a physician will ask people to drink all the water of the week in one sitting, and then conclude that drinking water is bad for people.

Physicians rarely do real research, mostly is development of the pharmaceutical companies agendas.

What are 10.000 physicians chained to the bottom of the ocean? ops, I forgot, the joke is with lawyers...
drj27
not rated yet Oct 11, 2016
Poor dosing, vit D is made daily. 5000 to 10000 units a day. Study designed to fail.

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