Depression drug reduces joint pain for women with early stage breast cancer

December 9, 2016

A drug typically used to treat depression and anxiety can significantly reduce joint pain in postmenopausal women being treated for early stage breast cancer, according to new SWOG research to be presented Friday at a special plenary presentation at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

Investigators from SWOG, the international network funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to test whether duloxetine, a depression and anxiety drug, could alleviate pain caused by aromatase inhibitors, a common that's particularly effective with .

Dr. N. Lynn Henry led the clinical trial, called S1202. A SWOG investigator from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah and co-chair of SWOG's symptom control and quality of life committee, Henry wanted to conduct the study because it addressed a common problem for women with breast cancer. Tens of thousands of postmenopausal women each year are treated with (AIs), pills that stop the production of estrogen and essentially starve hormone receptor-positive breast cancer cells. Many women - as many as 50 percent—experience and stiffness as a side effect of AI therapy. About 20 percent experience significant pain. This can affect knees, hips, hands, and wrists, and make it difficult for women to walk, climb stairs, do simple tasks like type, or sit for an extended period of time.

Henry said some women stop taking their medication to get relief. The pain is so common it has a name: AI-Associated Musculoskeletal Syndrome (AIMSS).

"A lot of 60-year-old women report feeling like they're 80," Henry said. "The pain can really interfere with daily life. And this is a big problem. The length of treatment with AIs can be five to 10 years, so we're asking a lot of women to manage significant discomfort for a very long period of time."

While clinical trials have shown that acupuncture and exercise can reduce symptoms of AIMSS, there is no evidence for an effective solution for all women. Henry and her team chose to test duloxetine, a drug commonly sold as Cymbalta by original maker Eli Lilly and Company. Duloxetine is primarily used to treat depression and anxiety, and also fibromyalgia and nerve pain caused by diabetes.

SWOG researchers enrolled 299 adult patients to S1202 at 43 institutions throughout the NCI's National Cancer Trials Network (NCTN) and the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). Those 299 patients were randomly assigned to either receive duloxetine or a placebo for 12 weeks. They filled out a questionnaire upon enrolling, and again at two, six, 12 and 24 weeks into the study. Questions focused on pain, rated on a 0-10 scale, and also on depression and quality of life.

Results showed that patients taking duloxetine saw their average pain drop on the scale from 5.5 to about 3. Improvement was rapid, and relief persisted through the end of the 12-week trial. Improvement in was also seen in the placebo arm of the trial, suggesting a robust placebo effect. Henry will present her findings at one of six plenary sessions at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, a leading cancer research conference with an international audience.

"We've shown that this treatment is a potential option for ," Dr. Henry said. "Taking this drug may help them tolerate their treatment. And it's important for their health that they stick with their treatment."

Explore further: Electro-acupuncture for disrupted sleep in women with breast cancer

Related Stories

Electro-acupuncture for disrupted sleep in women with breast cancer

November 28, 2016
It's somewhat of a little-known adverse effect of having breast cancer, but studies suggest that approximately 30% to 40% of women with breast cancer report persistent hot flashes. Nocturnal hot flashes are among the most ...

Acupuncture improves quality of life for breast cancer patients using aromatase inhibitors

July 30, 2014
Use of electroacupuncture (EA) – a form of acupuncture where a small electric current is passed between pairs of acupuncture needles – produces significant improvements in fatigue, anxiety and depression in as little ...

Decade of hormone therapy reduces breast cancer recurrence: study

June 5, 2016
Doubling the duration of hormone therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer from five to 10 years reduces the risk of recurrence and developing tumors in the other breast, a study showed Sunday.

Exercise improves drug-associated joint pain in breast cancer survivors

December 12, 2013
Breast cancer survivors taking aromatase inhibitors (AIs) such as anastrozole, letrozole, and exemestane experienced a reduction in joint pain if they exercised while on treatment, according to results presented here at the ...

Recommended for you

Lung cancer triggers pulmonary hypertension

November 17, 2017
Shortness of breath and respiratory distress often increase the suffering of advanced-stage lung cancer patients. These symptoms can be triggered by pulmonary hypertension, as scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Heart ...

Researchers discover an Achilles heel in a lethal leukemia

November 16, 2017
Researchers have discovered how a linkage between two proteins in acute myeloid leukemia enables cancer cells to resist chemotherapy and showed that disrupting the linkage could render the cells vulnerable to treatment. St. ...

Computer program finds new uses for old drugs

November 16, 2017
Researchers at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have developed a computer program to find new indications for old drugs. The computer program, called DrugPredict, ...

Pharmacoscopy improves therapy for relapsed blood cancer in a first clinical trial

November 16, 2017
Researchers at CeMM and the Medical University of Vienna presented a preliminary report in The Lancet Hematology on the clinical impact of an integrated ex vivo approach called pharmacoscopy. The procedures measure single-cell ...

Wider sampling of tumor tissues may guide drug choice, improve outcomes

November 15, 2017
A new study focused on describing genetic variations within a primary tumor, differences between the primary and a metastatic branch of that tumor, and additional diversity found in tumor DNA in the blood stream could help ...

A new strategy for prevention of liver cancer development

November 14, 2017
Primary liver cancer is now the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and its incidences and mortality are increasing rapidly in the United Stated. In late stages of the malignancy, there are no effective ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.