How will electronic medical records and patient portals change patient care

December 5, 2016, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc
Credit: ©Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Judy Faulkner, CEO of Epic Systems, the dominant U.S. provider of electronic medical records (EMRs) has a bird's-eye view of the impact EMRs is having on doctors, patients, and healthcare delivery, and she shares her perspectives on the future of data-driven, patient-centered medicine in an interview published in the new peer-reviewed, open access journalzine Healthcare Transformations.

In "An Interview with Judy Faulkner, CEO of Epic Systems," Healthcare Transformations Editor-in-Chief Stephen Klasko, MD, MBA, President, Thomas Jefferson University (TJU) and CEO Jefferson Health (Philadelphia, PA), raises important questions about how doctors will work differently in the future, and how patients and the healthcare system will benefit from the ongoing shift toward a more integrated, holistic approach to patient care that is based on actionable data captured in EMRs.

"We were honored to have this perspective from Judy Faulkner," says Healthcare Transformation Editor-in-Chief Stephen Klasko, MD, MBA, President, Thomas Jefferson University (TJU) and CEO Jefferson Health (Philadelphia, PA). "As a graduate student, she took what appeared to be a simple problem and ended up transforming the world of ."

Explore further: Aria Health, Thomas Jefferson University complete merger

More information: Stephen K. Klasko, An Epic Viewpoint: An Interview with Judy Faulkner, CEO of Epic Systems, Healthcare Transformation (2016). DOI: 10.1089/heat.2016.29026.jfa

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