1 in 4 U.S. adults, 1 in 10 teens use tobacco

January 26, 2017 by Steven Reinberg, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—Despite the dangers, many American adults and teens still use tobacco products, a new study finds.

Researchers looked at more than 46,000 people and found that 28 percent of American adults currently use some form of tobacco, while 9 percent of teens said they used tobacco in the past month.

Tobacco products included cigarettes, cigars, cigarillos, filtered cigars, pipe tobacco, hookahs, snus pouches and other smokeless tobacco.

Even more worrisome, 40 percent of tobacco users turned to more than one product, with cigarettes and e-cigarettes being the most common combination, the researchers said.

"We know with certainty that cigarette smoking is incredibly harmful," said lead researcher Andrew Hyland. He is chairman of the department of health behavior at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, N.Y.

"Cigarette smoking is responsible for 480,000 deaths in the U.S. each and every year, but getting completely off cigarettes quickly leads to improved health," he said.

According to the study, cigarette smoking continues to remain the most common form of tobacco use, Hyland said.

E-cigarettes trailed only cigarettes in popularity for both youths and adults, and hookah (waterpipe) smoking was very high among 18- to 24-year-olds, he added.

Among adults, 23 percent smoked cigarettes and 7 percent of those smokers also used e-cigarettes. Among kids aged 12 to 17, just over 13 percent smoked regular cigarettes, while 11 percent used e-cigarettes as well, the researchers found.

"Another surprising finding was that about four in 10 youth and adult tobacco users reported being current users of two or more tobacco products," Hyland said.

These statistics serve to help identify areas where additional tobacco regulation may be needed, he said.

The report was published Jan. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

This study underscores the importance for fully implementing the Tobacco Control Act, said Erika Sward, assistant vice president for national advocacy at the American Lung Association.

"The act specifically tasks FDA with looking at tobacco use and whether or not certain products or actions by companies would cause people to switch instead of quit," she said. "These findings call into question any positive impact e-cigarettes might have on public health," Sward said.

The lung association is concerned about people using both cigarettes and e-cigarettes, she added.

"We recognize that in many ways, at least for the larger tobacco companies, e-cigarettes are a way for people to keep using their 'cash cow' product, which is regular cigarettes," Sward said. "It's another way to discourage smokers from ending their tobacco addiction for good."

Explore further: Nearly two-thirds of smokers also use E-cigarettes: CDC

More information: Visit the American Lung Association for more on the dangers of smoking.

Andrew Hyland, Ph.D., chairman, department of health behavior, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, N.Y.; Erika Sward, assistant vice president, national advocacy, American Lung Association; Jan. 26, 2017, New England Journal of Medicine

Related Stories

Nearly two-thirds of smokers also use E-cigarettes: CDC

October 31, 2016
(HealthDay)—Many American adults who use electronic cigarettes also smoke tobacco cigarettes, a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention survey reveals.

3 in 4 teens think e-cigarettes safer than tobacco: survey

October 25, 2016
(HealthDay)—Close to three-quarters of American teenagers believe e-cigarettes are less harmful or addictive than real cigarettes, a new study finds.

Smoking losing its cool with kids, CDC says

September 22, 2016
(HealthDay)—U.S. teens seem to be losing interest in smoking cigarettes and cigars, a new federal report finds.

Flavored e-cigarettes may entice teens to smoke: study

November 7, 2016
(HealthDay)—Fruit- or candy-flavored electronic cigarettes may entice American teens to start smoking tobacco, a new study suggests.

Most under age 35 say e-cigs are safer, study aims to find out

November 1, 2016
Most Americans under age 35 think that using electronic cigarettes does not cause as much damage lung health as compared with traditional cigarettes, according to the results of a new national consumer survey.

No drop in teen use of tobacco products, CDC says, and E-cigs may be why

April 14, 2016
(HealthDay)—Use of tobacco products by U.S. teens hasn't fallen since 2011, and federal officials say electronic cigarettes may be to blame.

Recommended for you

Accurate measurements of sodium intake confirm relationship with mortality

June 21, 2018
Eating foods high in salt is known to contribute to high blood pressure, but does that linear relationship extend to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death? Recent cohort studies have contested that relationship, ...

Fans of yoga therapy have yet to win over doctors

June 21, 2018
Yoga practitioners often tout the unique health benefits of the ancient discipline—from relieving stress and pain to improving vascular health—but most doctors remain sceptical in the absence of hard proof.

Fruit and vegetables linked to changes in skin colour, new research finds

June 21, 2018
Skin colour in young Caucasian men is strongly linked to high levels of fruit and vegetable consumption, new research by Curtin University has found.

What a pain: The iPad neck plagues women more

June 20, 2018
Is your iPad being a literal pain in the neck?

Medicaid work requirements and health savings accounts may impact people's coverage

June 20, 2018
Current experimental approaches in Medicaid programs—including requirements to pay premiums, contribute to health savings accounts, or to work—may lead to unintended consequences for patient coverage and access, such ...

Introduction of alcohol found to adversely impact fertility rates in hunter-gatherer community

June 19, 2018
Fernando Ramirez Rozzi, a research director with the French National Centre for Scientific Research has found that the introduction of alcohol to a Baka pygmy hunter-gatherer society caused fertility rates to fall. In his ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.