Parathyroid hormone linked to arterial stiffness in T1DM

January 11, 2017

(HealthDay)—In individuals with type 1 diabetes, parathyroid hormone (PTH) is associated with arterial stiffness, even after adjustment for multiple confounding variables, according to research published online Jan. 6 in Diabetes Care.

Emilie H. Zobel, M.D., from the Steno Diabetes Center in Gentofte, Denmark, and colleagues examined the correlation between , evaluated by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), and bone mass density in a well-characterized cohort of 347 individuals with type 1 diabetes.

The researchers found that , all clinical bone markers, and markers of mineral metabolism, except calcium, phosphorus, and Dickkopf 1, correlated with cfPWV in unadjusted analyses (P ≤ 0.041). The level of bone mineral density, the clinical bone marker PTH, and the marker of bone mineral metabolism sclerostin correlated with cfPWV after adjustment for age, sex, and mean arterial pressure (P ≤ 0.027). PTH remained positively associated with cfPWV after further adjustment for additional risk factors, including hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, body mass index, antihypertensive treatment, rate, estimated , and smoking (P = 0.014).

"Our findings highlight PTH as a potential mediator for the cross talk between bone and vascular disease," the authors write. "However, our findings need validation, and prospective studies investigating the relationship between PTH and cardiovascular outcome in type 1 diabetes are warranted."

Explore further: Summer concentrations of 25OHD predict bone mineral density

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Uric acid levels low in teens with type 1 diabetes

March 1, 2016

(HealthDay)—Plasma uric acid (PUA) levels are significantly lower in adolescent patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) than in healthy control subjects, and there does not appear to be a link between PUA levels and cardiorenal ...

Menopausal hormone therapy improves bone health

November 17, 2016

Women who undergo hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes can not only increase bone mass, but also can improve bone structure, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of ...

Romosozumab increases bone mineral density post-menopause

January 6, 2014

(HealthDay)—Romosozumab seems safe and effective for increasing bone mineral density in postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density, according to a study published online Jan. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Recommended for you

Overweight affects DNA methylation

December 22, 2016

The extra pounds you gain during the holidays will not only show up on your hips but will also affect your DNA. This is the result of a large-scale international study coordinated by Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.