Patient perception of provider concern impacts satisfaction

January 17, 2017

(HealthDay)—For patients with chronic pain receiving opioids, provider satisfaction is not associated with functional outcomes; however, patient perception of provider concern impacts perceived satisfaction, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Pain Practice.

Anthony Dragovich, M.D., from Blue Ridge Pain Management in Salem, Va., and colleagues examined the determinants of patient satisfaction and the correlation with recommended outcome measures in a private practice clinic. Determinants of were defined using a four-week quality assessment survey among pain management patients who were prescribed opioids.

The researchers found that for a population prescribed opioids for over one year, overall provider satisfaction was 96 percent and clinic satisfaction was 94 percent. Provider satisfaction was not associated with functional outcomes. A positive correlation was only seen for "level of stress" with positive clinic satisfaction. The remaining functional outcomes were not associated with satisfaction. Significant predictors of provider satisfaction included "listened to you carefully about your questions and concerns," "treated you with courtesy and respect," and "helped you with your problem."

"These results indicate that a patient's perception of a provider's engagement and concern more heavily impacts perceived than the patient's progress," the authors write. "A patient's perception of his or her clinic experience is heavily influenced by the attentiveness and coordination of the entire clinic care team."

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