Excess BMI ups risk of T1DM in autoantibody-positive relatives

Excess BMI ups risk of T1DM in autoantibody-positive relatives

(HealthDay)—For autoantibody-positive relatives of patients with type 1 diabetes, elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of progression to type 1 diabetes, especially for those aged younger than 12 years, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in Diabetes Care.

Christine Therese Ferrara, M.D., from the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues studied 1,117 children in the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention cohort, which comprised autoantibody-positive relatives of patients with type 1 diabetes. A cumulative excess BMI (ceBMI) index was generated using longitudinally accumulated BMI above the 85th age- and sex-adjusted percentile. Sex- and age-specific ceBMI thresholds were examined for type 1 diabetes risk.

The researchers found that higher ceBMI conferred significantly elevated risk of progression to type 1 diabetes. In children aged younger than 12 years, the increased occurred at lower ceBMI values, compared with older subjects, and in females versus males.

"Elevated BMI is associated with increased risk of diabetes progression in pediatric autoantibody-positive relatives, but the effect varies by sex and age," the authors write.


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Journal information: Diabetes Care

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Citation: Excess BMI ups risk of T1DM in autoantibody-positive relatives (2017, February 20) retrieved 19 August 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-02-excess-bmi-ups-t1dm-autoantibody-positive.html
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