Sleep: the great motivator

February 3, 2017

(HealthDay)—If you really want to follow through on your New Year's resolutions, make sure you get enough sleep.

That's the advice of Michigan specialist Dr. Cathy Goldstein.

Adequate sleep is a key component when trying to achieve goals—whether it's healthier eating, more exercise, quitting smoking, improving relationships or getting ahead at work, she said.

"We definitely take sleep as a luxury; it's not," said Goldstein, an assistant professor of neurology in the University of Michigan Sleep Disorders Centers.

People who don't get enough sleep are more likely to make poor food choices and to eat more, Goldstein said in a university news release.

They're also less likely to feel motivated to exercise or stick to their no-smoking plan; more likely to be in a ; and they're probably less productive at work, she said.

Goldstein advised getting seven to eight hours of sleep a night, going to bed at the same time each evening, keeping your bedroom as dark as possible, and covering up any direct glow from electronics or clocks.

"You're most sensitive to in the middle of the night. Even low levels can have a negative effect," Goldstein said.

It's also important not to use your smartphone or tablet while in bed, and to set the phone to "do not disturb" mode to prevent from late-night calls or texts, she added.

Explore further: Sleep is key to college success

More information: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on sleep.

Related Stories

Sleep is key to college success

August 17, 2016
(HealthDay)—It can be hard for college students to get enough sleep, and that can affect their physical and mental well-being, a sleep expert says.

Shift work and sleep problems

December 27, 2016
Dear Mayo Clinic: I started working a night shift six months ago, and I just can't get enough sleep. I'm having a hard time staying asleep during the day. Most days, I get five hours of sleep or less. What can I do to get ...

Immune system reboots during sleep

January 4, 2017
(HealthDay)—Researchers say they've gained new insight into how the immune system restores itself during sleep.

Video: What you need to know about sleep

March 21, 2016
Dr. Alon Avidan, a professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Sleep Disorders Center, offers these tips for getting better sleep:

Why do we sacrifice sleep?

November 17, 2016
Sleeping well is often cited as a key method of improving one's health and well-being. But when the challenges of life require more hours in the day than a person has available, sleep is often sacrificed.

Dreaming of a good night's sleep

October 22, 2015
New research from the University of Leeds has revealed that some people are losing more than 15 day's worth of sleep a year.

Recommended for you

Regular takeaways linked to kids' heart disease and diabetes risk factors

December 14, 2017
Kids who regularly eat take-away meals may be boosting their risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Simulation model finds Cure Violence program and targeted policing curb urban violence

December 14, 2017
When communities and police work together to deter urban violence, they can achieve better outcomes with fewer resources than when each works in isolation, a simulation model created by researchers at the UC Davis Violence ...

One in five patients report discrimination in health care

December 14, 2017
Almost one in five older patients with a chronic disease reported experiencing health care discrimination of one type or another in a large national survey that asked about their daily experiences of discrimination between ...

Your pets can't put your aging on 'paws'

December 14, 2017
(HealthDay)—In a finding that's sure to ruffle some fur and feathers, scientists report that having a pet doesn't fend off age-related declines in physical or mental health.

Searching for a link between achy joints and rainy weather in a flood of data, researchers come up dry

December 13, 2017
Rainy weather has long been blamed for achy joints. Unjustly so, according to new research from Harvard Medical School. The analysis, published Dec. 13 in BMJ, found no relationship between rainfall and joint or back pain.

Mistletoe and (a large) wine: Seven-fold increase in wine glass size over 300 years

December 13, 2017
Our Georgian and Victorian ancestors probably celebrated Christmas with more modest wine consumption than we do today - if the size of their wine glasses are anything to go by. Researchers at the University of Cambridge have ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.