Neuroscience

The sleeping brain remains attentive to its environment

By exposing sleepers to complex sounds, researchers from the CNRS and ENS Paris1, in collaboration with Monash University (Australia), have just demonstrated that our brain can track the sounds in its environment while we ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Hallucination care and collaboration

While some hallucinations happen in mental health contexts, they can also happen under fairly normal circumstances. In fact, there is a window of time—typically when we are drifting in and out of sleep—when anybody is ...

Health

Why you should stop buying vitamins and get more sleep instead

Almost half of all Canadians regularly take at least one nutritional supplement such as vitamins, minerals, fibre supplements, antacids and fish oils. Many of these individuals are healthy and hoping to improve general well-being ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Decreased deep sleep linked to early signs of Alzheimer's disease

Poor sleep is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. People with the disease tend to wake up tired, and their nights become even less refreshing as memory loss and other symptoms worsen. But how and why restless nights are linked ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Insomnia has many faces

Researchers at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience revealed that there are five types of insomnia. This finding was published on Monday January 7 by The Lancet Psychiatry. A commentary in the journal stated that the ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

What are the effects of total isolation? An expert explains

Imagine being confined to a small, dark room, with no social interaction whatsoever for 30 days. Not many people would jump at this opportunity. But, in November 2018, a professional US poker player Rich Alati bet US$100,000 ...

Health

Catching up on news about catch-up sleep

(HealthDay)—Missing out on needed sleep can bring a host of health woes, including diabetes because a lack of sleep affects insulin levels.

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Sleep

Sleep is a natural state of bodily rest observed in humans and other animals. It is distinguished from quiet wakefulness by a decreased ability to react to stimuli, and it is more easily reversible than hibernation or coma. It is common to all mammals and birds, and is also seen in many reptiles, amphibians, and fish. In humans, other mammals, and a substantial majority of other animals that have been studied (such as some species of fish, birds, ants, and fruit flies), regular sleep is essential for survival.

The purposes and mechanisms of sleep are only partly clear and are the subject of intense research.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA