Research finds ski helmets lessens severity of injuries

February 27, 2017, Children's Hospital Colorado

New research from Children's Hospital Colorado (Children's Colorado) focused on helmet safety and injury prevention among young skiers and snowboarders. The research found that children who wear a helmet while skiing or snowboarding sustain less severe head injuries and lower overall injury severity, compared to children who do not wear a helmet. The research was published in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery in February 2017.

The research was led by Steven Moulton MD, medical director of the trauma program at Children's Colorado. The study analyzed 16 years of level I data from Children's Colorado and included ages 3-17 years old who sustained an injury while skiing or snowboarding. In addition to proving the benefits of helmet use, Dr. Moulton found that young Colorado residents were nearly twice as likely to be wearing a helmet at the time of injury, compared to visitors from out-of-state.

"Many Colorado parents may not view these findings as a surprise. It is imperative, however, that we broaden the conversation so that parents who encourage their children to ski or snowboard know that wearing a helmet is protective, but does not excuse recklessness," said Dr. Moulton. "Parents must teach their kids to enjoy snow sports within their own safety limits. Wearing a helmet lowers the risk of sustaining a serious head injury—but does not prevent other serious bodily injury."

Explore further: Winter's no reason to hibernate: head outside for some sports fun

More information: Melissa Milan et al. Helmet use and injury severity among pediatric skiers and snowboarders in Colorado, Journal of Pediatric Surgery (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2016.11.001

Related Stories

Winter's no reason to hibernate: head outside for some sports fun

February 8, 2017
(HealthDay)—Forget what the thermometer says: Winter is a great time for outdoor activities. But you should follow certain safety rules to reduce your risk of injury.

Only 11 percent of children involved in bike accidents wear a helmet

October 26, 2013
Despite a California bike helmet mandate, only 11 percent of Los Angeles County children treated for bike-related injuries were wearing a helmet, according to an abstract presented Oct. 26 at the American Academy of Pediatrics ...

Cyclist's benefit from helmets clearly shown

May 6, 2013
Cyclists who don't wear a helmet are almost six times more likely to suffer a severe head injury than their helmeted counterparts, according University of Sydney research published in the latest issue of the Medical Journal ...

Recommended for you

Surgeons have substantial impact on genetic testing in breast cancer patients who need it

July 3, 2018
For many women diagnosed with breast cancer, genetic testing can offer important information that might guide treatment choices. But studies have shown that only about half of women who could benefit receive genetic testing.

First major study comparing robotic to open surgery published in The Lancet

June 21, 2018
The first comprehensive study comparing the outcomes of robotic surgery to those of traditional open surgery in any organ has found that the surgeries are equally effective in treating bladder cancer. The seven-year study, ...

Antibodies may predict transplant rejection risk

June 19, 2018
The presence of certain antibodies in patients may suggest a higher risk of transplant rejection across multiple organ types, including the kidney, liver, heart and lungs, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine.

First human test of robotic eye surgery a success

June 18, 2018
Researchers from the University of Oxford have completed the first successful trial of robot-assisted retinal surgery.

Surgical blood transfusions tied to clot risk

June 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—Blood transfusions around the time of surgery may raise your risk for dangerous blood clots, researchers say.

Tonsil and adenoid removal associated with respiratory, allergic and infectious disease

June 7, 2018
Tonsil and adenoid removal associated with long-term risks of respiratory, allergic and infectious diseases Removing tonsils and adenoids in childhood increases the long-term risk of respiratory, allergic and infectious diseases, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.