Screening, HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer: FDA

February 8, 2017

(HealthDay)—Women can reduce their risk of cervical cancer through vaccination and screening, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

In 2016, an estimated 13,000 women in the United States were diagnosed with and more than 4,100 died from the disease, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

The FDA wants to make women aware of how to protect themselves from cervical cancer, which is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV).

An FDA-approved vaccine called Gardasil 9 protects against 9 HPV types and can prevent about 90 percent of cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer cancers, and also protects against genital warts. The vaccine is approved for use in females and males aged 9 to 26.

Gardasil 9 is not a treatment for HPV disease or cervical cancer, noted Marion Gruber, director of the FDA's Office of Vaccines Research and Review.

"Women, including those who have been vaccinated, should continue to get Pap tests because they are essential to detect cervical cancer and precancerous changes," she said in an FDA news release.

A Pap test (or smear) and HPV test are two ways to spot cervical cancer. If abnormalities are detected on a Pap smear, follow-up testing may include another Pap smear, a HPV test and testing tissue via biopsy from the cervix.

Cervical cancer often causes no pain, which means a woman can have cervical cancer and not know it. That makes testing for the disease that much more important. The earlier the cancer is detected, the easier it is to treat, the FDA said.

Explore further: Five tips for preventing cervical cancer

More information: The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on cervical cancer.

Related Stories

Five tips for preventing cervical cancer

January 13, 2017
Silent but deadly. These are words often used to describe cervical cancer—a slow-growing disease that rarely causes symptoms in its early stages.

Cervical cancer is preventable, but still a leading cancer

January 11, 2017
At the beginning of the year, many women (and men) set resolutions around health and fitness, often focusing on weight loss. But one of the most important habits women can form revolves around regular health checks, particularly ...

New HPV approved after international phase 2/3 trial

February 20, 2015
Approximately 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States and another 4,000 die annually from the disease. However, most cervical cancers are preventable through immunization against the ...

Cervical cancer screening could be less frequent, start later

October 17, 2016
Women may only need cervical cancer screening every 5-10 years—instead of every three years, as currently recommended—and may be able to start the screenings later in life, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan ...

More than two-thirds of cervical cancer deaths prevented by screening

September 19, 2016
Cervical screening prevents 70 per cent of cervical cancer deaths and if all eligible women regularly attended screening this would rise to 83 per cent, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Low incidence of cervical cancer, CIN3+ for HPV-negative women

October 7, 2016
(HealthDay)—Human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative women have low long-term incidence of cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 or worse (CIN3+), which supports an extension of the cervical screening ...

Recommended for you

Researchers use a molecular Trojan horse to deliver chemotherapeutic drug to cancer cells

February 23, 2018
A research team at the University of California, Riverside has discovered a way for chemotherapy drug paclitaxel to target migrating, or circulating, cancer cells, which are responsible for the development of tumor metastases.

Lab-grown 'mini tumours' could personalise cancer treatment

February 23, 2018
Testing cancer drugs on miniature replicas of a patient's tumour could help doctors tailor treatment, according to new research.

An under-the-radar immune cell shows potential in fight against cancer

February 23, 2018
One of the rarest of immune cells, unknown to scientists a decade ago, might prove to be a potent weapon in stopping cancer from spreading in the body, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

Study tracks evolutionary transition to destructive cancer

February 23, 2018
Evolution describes how all living forms cope with challenges in their environment, as they struggle to persevere against formidable odds. Mutation and selective pressure—cornerstones of Darwin's theory—are the means ...

Putting black skin cancer to sleep—for good

February 22, 2018
An international research team has succeeded in stopping the growth of malignant melanoma by reactivating a protective mechanism that prevents tumor cells from dividing. The team used chemical agents to block the enzymes ...

Cancer risk associated with key epigenetic changes occurring through normal aging process

February 22, 2018
Some scientists have hypothesized that tumor-promoting changes in cells during cancer development—particularly an epigenetic change involving DNA methylation—arise from rogue cells escaping a natural cell deterioration ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.