Oncology & Cancer

Using sponges to wipe out cancer

A sponge found in Manado Bay, Indonesia, makes a molecule called manzamine A, which stops the growth of cervical cancer cells, according to a recent publication in the Journal of Natural Products submitted by researchers ...

Oncology & Cancer

Disasters can affect cervical cancer screening for years

Cervical cancer screening rates in Japan were significantly affected in the years following the devastating Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, Tohoku University scientists report in the journal PLOS ONE.

Oncology & Cancer

Scientists find new way to block cancer-causing HPV virus

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of several cancers, including cervical cancer, which kills almost 300,000 women around the world each year. Although vaccines offer a proven first line of defense against HPV ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Study evaluates cervical cancer risks of IUDs

Patients who used copper intrauterine devices (Cu IUD) were found to have a lower risk of high-grade cervical neoplasms (cervical cancer) compared to users of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS), according ...

Oncology & Cancer

Prevention and prognosis of cervical cancer

Jiayao Lei's thesis addresses research questions on prevention and prognosis of cervical cancer within the framework of the interplay of human papillomavirus (HPV), vaccination, and cervical screening, and also provides insights ...

Oncology & Cancer

U.S. life expectancy goes up as cancer deaths go down

U.S. life expectancy increased in 2018 after a worrisome four-year decline, a reversal owing in part to a welcome decrease in deaths due to overdose but even more so to a drop in those from cancer. The rise brought the anticipated ...

page 1 from 67

Cervical cancer

Cervical cancer is malignant cancer of the cervix uteri or cervical area. It may present with vaginal bleeding but symptoms may be absent until the cancer is in its advanced stages. Treatment consists of surgery (including local excision) in early stages and chemotherapy and radiotherapy in advanced stages of the disease.

Pap smear screening can identify potentially precancerous changes. Treatment of high grade changes can prevent the development of cancer. In developed countries, the widespread use of cervical screening programs has reduced the incidence of invasive cervical cancer by 50% or more.[citation needed]

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary factor in the development of nearly all cases of cervical cancer. HPV vaccine effective against the two strains of HPV that cause the most cervical cancer has been licensed in the U.S. and the EU. These two HPV strains together are currently responsible for approximately 70% of all cervical cancers. Since the vaccine only covers some high-risk types, women should seek regular Pap smear screening, even after vaccination.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA