Oncology & Cancer

Women's cancer screenings plummeted during pandemic

(HealthDay)—Breast and cervical cancer screenings dropped sharply among low-income minority women during the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

Oncology & Cancer

Financial barriers to cervical cancer screening

Among low-income, uninsured, or publicly insured women ages 25-64 years who were not up to date on cervical cancer screening, 72% perceived financial barriers to screening. The most commonly reported barriers were screening ...

Oncology & Cancer

Let's talk about HPV: 6 common questions answered

Talking about a virus is all a lot of us seem to be doing at the moment. We're happy enough chatting away about COVID-19 and other common viruses like the cold or flu, so why is there so little conversation about HPV?

Vaccination

HPV vaccine shows success in gay, bisexual men

A study by Monash University and Alfred Health found a 70 percent reduction in one type of human papillomavirus (HPV) in gay and bisexual men after the implementation of the school-based HPV vaccination program.

Oncology & Cancer

HPV vaccination is lowering U.S. cervical cancer rates

In a finding that offers the first evidence that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is indeed protecting women from cervical cancer, new research shows cases in the United States have slowly but steadily declined over ...

Oncology & Cancer

Few women in sub-Saharan Africa undergo cervical cancer screenings

According to the World Health Organization, cervical cancer is the fourth most common form of cancer affecting women worldwide, and those in developing countries face a higher risk of dying from it. If detected early, cervical ...

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Cervical cancer

Cervical cancer is malignant cancer of the cervix uteri or cervical area. It may present with vaginal bleeding but symptoms may be absent until the cancer is in its advanced stages. Treatment consists of surgery (including local excision) in early stages and chemotherapy and radiotherapy in advanced stages of the disease.

Pap smear screening can identify potentially precancerous changes. Treatment of high grade changes can prevent the development of cancer. In developed countries, the widespread use of cervical screening programs has reduced the incidence of invasive cervical cancer by 50% or more.[citation needed]

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary factor in the development of nearly all cases of cervical cancer. HPV vaccine effective against the two strains of HPV that cause the most cervical cancer has been licensed in the U.S. and the EU. These two HPV strains together are currently responsible for approximately 70% of all cervical cancers. Since the vaccine only covers some high-risk types, women should seek regular Pap smear screening, even after vaccination.

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