Medications

Chemist talks HPV, antivirals, progress toward cure

Human papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S. according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That fact alone makes the work of James Bashkin, a professor of chemistry at ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Nearly half of adults in US infected with HPV

If you currently are sexually active, have been sexually active in the past or have sex in the future, there's an extremely high chance that at some point before your sex life is over you will have been infected with the ...

Oncology & Cancer

Scientists find new way to block cancer-causing HPV virus

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of several cancers, including cervical cancer, which kills almost 300,000 women around the world each year. Although vaccines offer a proven first line of defense against HPV ...

Oncology & Cancer

New therapy wipes out cervical cancer in two women

Aricca Wallace knew she was nearly out of time. For more than three years, she had suffered cramping and irregular bleeding, which her doctor thought was a side effect of her birth control implant, known as an intrauterine ...

Oncology & Cancer

Does HPV vaccination prevent the development of cervical cancer?

New evidence published today in the Cochrane Library shows that human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines protect against cervical lesions in young women, particularly in those who are vaccinated between the ages of 15 and 26. ...

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Cervical cancer

Cervical cancer is malignant cancer of the cervix uteri or cervical area. It may present with vaginal bleeding but symptoms may be absent until the cancer is in its advanced stages. Treatment consists of surgery (including local excision) in early stages and chemotherapy and radiotherapy in advanced stages of the disease.

Pap smear screening can identify potentially precancerous changes. Treatment of high grade changes can prevent the development of cancer. In developed countries, the widespread use of cervical screening programs has reduced the incidence of invasive cervical cancer by 50% or more.[citation needed]

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary factor in the development of nearly all cases of cervical cancer. HPV vaccine effective against the two strains of HPV that cause the most cervical cancer has been licensed in the U.S. and the EU. These two HPV strains together are currently responsible for approximately 70% of all cervical cancers. Since the vaccine only covers some high-risk types, women should seek regular Pap smear screening, even after vaccination.

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