Brief interview by doctor may cut cannabis use in some youth

March 20, 2017

(HealthDay)—A brief intervention conducted by general practitioners could reduce cannabis use among some younger users, according to a study published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Catherine Laporte, M.D., Ph.D., from the University Clermont in France, and colleagues conducted a cluster randomized trial involving 77 in France to test the efficacy of a brief intervention among cannabis users aged 15 to 25 years. The intervention comprised an interview designed according to the feedback, responsibility, advice, menu, empathy, self-efficacy model, while the control condition was routine care. Two hundred sixty-one young were screened and followed.

The researchers found that among all users there was no significant between-group difference in the median number of joints smoked per month after one year (17.5 versus 17.5; P = 0.13); however, among non-daily users there was a difference in favor of the intervention (3.0 versus 10.0; P = 0.01). In terms of the number of joints smoked, the intervention correlated with a more favorable change from baseline after six months (−33.3 versus 0 percent; P = 0.01). The correlated with smoking of fewer joints per month among users younger than 18 years (12.5 versus 20.0; P = 0.04).

"Our results do, however, strongly support use of brief interventions for users who are younger than age 18 and for moderate, non-daily users," the authors write.

Explore further: Cannabis excess linked to bone disease and fractures, study finds

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