What to know about online dating sites

April 20, 2017 by Joan Mcclusky, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—If you're looking for love, chances are you'll at least consider—if not turn to—online dating sites. But how can you make a successful romantic computer connection?

Experts say that one key is picking the right dating sites.

First, consider the old adage that you get what you pay for. Free sites may be more appealing to those who are just looking. Sites that charge a monthly fee may attract people more interested in a real relationship.

Deciding what you're truly looking for in a partner can help narrow your choices. A so-called matchmaking might be your best bet for a long-term relationship. Other sites are geared more to casual dating. Also consider niche-dating sites, based on a shared religion or special interests. Read reviews of dating websites and also ask friends for recommendations.

Once you've found someone who looks interesting, make sure to take steps to stay safe—advice that never goes out of style. Don't give out financial information, and stay anonymous until you feel ready to share personal details. Before you meet in person, do some "independent" online research on your potential date: Google him or her and check out their social media pages.

When you do get together, use your own transportation, meet in a and tell a friend when and where you're going.

Take a smart approach to this high-tech route to romance, and you might just find Mr. or Ms. Right.

Explore further: Sensitive people more vulnerable to online dating scams

More information: Wide-ranging information on Internet safety for adults is available from the USAA Educational Foundation.

Related Stories

Sensitive people more vulnerable to online dating scams

April 27, 2016
Sensitive and less emotionally intelligent people are more likely to be vulnerable to online dating scams.

Recommended for you

Suicidal thoughts rapidly reduced with ketamine, finds study

December 14, 2017
Ketamine was significantly more effective than a commonly used sedative in reducing suicidal thoughts in depressed patients, according to researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). They also found that ketamine's ...

Do bullies have more sex?

December 14, 2017
Adolescents who are willing to exploit others for personal gain are more likely to bully and have sex than those who score higher on a measure of honesty and humility. This is according to a study in Springer's journal Evolutionary ...

Children's screen-time guidelines too restrictive, according to new research

December 14, 2017
Digital screen use is a staple of contemporary life for adults and children, whether they are browsing on laptops and smartphones, or watching TV. Paediatricians and scientists have long expressed concerns about the impact ...

Eating together as a family helps children feel better, physically and mentally

December 14, 2017
Children who routinely eat their meals together with their family are more likely to experience long-term physical and mental health benefits, a new Canadian study shows.

The iceberg model of self-harm

December 14, 2017
Researchers have created a model of self-harm that shows high levels of the problem in the community, especially in young girls, and the need for school-based prevention measures.

Anti-stress compound reduces obesity and diabetes

December 13, 2017
For the first time, scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich could prove that a stress protein found in muscle has a diabetes promoting effect. This finding could pave the way to a completely new treatment ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.