What to know about online dating sites

April 20, 2017 by Joan Mcclusky, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—If you're looking for love, chances are you'll at least consider—if not turn to—online dating sites. But how can you make a successful romantic computer connection?

Experts say that one key is picking the right dating sites.

First, consider the old adage that you get what you pay for. Free sites may be more appealing to those who are just looking. Sites that charge a monthly fee may attract people more interested in a real relationship.

Deciding what you're truly looking for in a partner can help narrow your choices. A so-called matchmaking might be your best bet for a long-term relationship. Other sites are geared more to casual dating. Also consider niche-dating sites, based on a shared religion or special interests. Read reviews of dating websites and also ask friends for recommendations.

Once you've found someone who looks interesting, make sure to take steps to stay safe—advice that never goes out of style. Don't give out financial information, and stay anonymous until you feel ready to share personal details. Before you meet in person, do some "independent" online research on your potential date: Google him or her and check out their social media pages.

When you do get together, use your own transportation, meet in a and tell a friend when and where you're going.

Take a smart approach to this high-tech route to romance, and you might just find Mr. or Ms. Right.

Explore further: Sensitive people more vulnerable to online dating scams

More information: Wide-ranging information on Internet safety for adults is available from the USAA Educational Foundation.

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