Developing therapeutic peptides from scorpion venom

April 21, 2017, University of Queensland
Developing therapeutic peptides from scorpion venom
Rhopalurus junceus is described as a blue scorpion due to the colouring in its tail. Credit: University of Queensland

Canadian health and wellness company PreveCeutical Medical Inc. (PMI) has signed a research and option agreement with UniQuest, The University of Queensland's main commercialisation company, to develop stabilised natural and synthetic peptides from scorpion venom for immune-boosting applications.

PMI has an interest in the preventative health sector and is developing products derived from Caribbean blue for the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical market.

This includes the CellB9 Immune System Booster product, which contains peptides that are obtained from the Caribbean blue .

In collaboration with UniQuest, PMI aims to identify the active peptides that provide immune-boosting and tumor-selective painting properties, develop synthetic versions of the active peptides and ultimately identify other therapeutic applications.

UniQuest CEO Dr Dean Moss said the project was based on the research of Dr Harendra (Harry) Parekh, of UQ School of Pharmacy, who will be collaborating with PMI.

"UQ's School of Pharmacy has unique intellectual property in stabilising therapeutic and is in a position to add value by extending PreveCeutical's product line," Dr Moss said.

"This agreement exemplifies the quality of UQ's intellectual property and the willingness of its researchers to engage globally with industry to develop new products through university-industry collaborations."

PMI Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Stephen Van Deventer said working with UniQuest and UQ presented unique opportunities to develop products that promoted health and wellness.

"Wellness products developed from scorpion venom-derived natural and have the potential to be applied across a number of therapeutic applications including boosting the immune system," Mr Van Deventer said.

Explore further: New research set to improve traditional Chinese cancer treatment

Related Stories

New research set to improve traditional Chinese cancer treatment

March 9, 2017
Dried skin secretions from toads could soon be used in a treatment for the benefit of cancer patients.

Scorpion venom has toxic effects against cancer cells

May 27, 2015
A study has found over a hundred proteins identified as possible anti-cancer agents in Centruroides tecomanus scorpion venom from Colima, south-west state of Mexico.

New treatment for chemotherapy patients a step closer to the clinic

December 6, 2016
Patients at risk of life-threatening infections following chemotherapy could benefit from a new cell-based treatment developed from University of Queensland research.

Recommended for you

Doctors prescribe opioids at high rates to those at increased overdose risk

April 24, 2018
The number of first-time prescriptions for opioid drugs has not risen since about 2010, according to UCLA researchers. However, patients taking a class of drug known to increase the risk for overdoses were likelier to receive ...

Study: Ibuprofen, acetaminophen more effective than opioids in treating dental pain

April 17, 2018
Opioids are not among the most effective—or longest lasting—options available for relief from acute dental pain, a new examination of the results from more than 460 published studies has found.

Text messaging tool may help fight opioid epidemic

April 17, 2018
A new automated text messaging service may curb opioid abuse and reduce the likelihood of relapse while also decreasing treatment costs, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine and Epharmix, a ...

Marijuana-based drug gets positive review from US agency

April 17, 2018
A closely watched medicine made from the marijuana plant reduces seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy and warrants approval in the United States, health officials said Tuesday.

Post-surgical opioids can, paradoxically, lead to chronic pain

April 16, 2018
Giving opioids to animals to quell pain after surgery prolongs pain for more than three weeks and primes specialized immune cells in the spinal cord to be more reactive to pain, according to a new study by the University ...

Animal study suggests common diabetes drug may also help with nicotine withdrawal

April 5, 2018
In a mouse study, a drug that has helped millions of people around the world manage their diabetes might also help people ready to kick their nicotine habits.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.