Extra weight may increase dental risks

May 17, 2017

Being overweight or obese was linked with an increased likelihood of having poor oral health in a recent study.

In the study of 160 participants, those with BMI ?23 had generally more severe periodontitis, total inflammatory dental diseases, and leukocyte counts than individuals. Patients who were obese (BMI ?25) had almost a 6-times increased risk for severe periodontitis compared with normal weight participants. Altered inflammatory molecules that are associated with may play a role.

The results are published in Oral Diseases.

Explore further: Central obesity ups mortality across BMI range

More information: S Thanakun et al, Increased oral inflammation, leukocytes, and leptin, and lower adiponectin in overweight or obesity, Oral Diseases (2017). DOI: 10.1111/odi.12679

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