Region in brain found to be associated with fear of uncertain future

May 18, 2017
Credit: George Hodan/public domain

People who struggle to cope with uncertainty or the ambiguity of potential future threats may have an unusually large striatum, an area of the brain already associated with general anxiety disorder, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

"Uncertainty and ambiguity of potential future threats are central to understanding the generation of and anxiety ," said lead author Justin Kim, PhD, of Dartmouth College. "Our research suggests a relationship between an individual's ability to deal with this uncertainty and the volume of within a specific area of the brain."

The research was published in the APA journal Emotion.

In the study, 61 students had MRI scans taken of their brains after filling out a survey designed to measure their ability to tolerate the uncertainty of future negative events. Kim and his colleagues analyzed the MRIs and compared them with the intolerance of uncertainty scores. They found the volume of the striatum was significantly associated with intolerance of uncertainty.

"People who had difficulty tolerating an uncertain future had a relatively enlarged striatum," said Kim. "What surprised us was that it was only the striatum and not other parts of the brain we examined."

Previous studies focusing specifically on patients with obsessive compulsive disorder and general anxiety disorder have also found increased gray matter volumes in the striatum, but this is the first time it has been found in association with intolerance of uncertainty in the absence of a confirmed diagnosis, according to Kim.

"Our findings demonstrate that the relationship between increased striatal volumes and intolerance of uncertainty can be observed in healthy individuals," he said. "Having a relatively enlarged volume of the striatum may be associated with how intolerant you are when facing an , but it does not mean you have OCD or ."

While the striatum has been primarily known for its role in motor function, animal studies have also suggested that it plays a role in how we predict whether or not we will receive a reward for a particular behavior while learning new tasks, according to Kim. "To put it another way, the striatum encodes how predictable and expected a reward is - a higher form of reward processing compared to simply responding to a reward. Given that an important component of intolerance of is a desire for predictability, our findings offer a biological marker related to our need for predictability," he said.

Since the findings came from psychologically healthy individuals, Kim suggested that that the volume of the striatum in young adults could predict those at risk for developing generalized anxiety disorder or OCD later in life, but that remains to be seen. More important, he said, the findings could serve as a starting point for treating symptoms specific to these disorders by monitoring the and tracking its volume over the course of treatment.

Explore further: Uncertainty fear and eating disorders linked

More information: "Intolerance of Uncertainty Predicts Increased Striatal Volume," by M. Justin Kim, PhD, Jin Shin, James Taylor, PhD, Alison Mattek, Samantha Chavez, and Paul Whalen, PhD, Dartmouth College. Emotion, published May 15, 2017.

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2 comments

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LaPortaMA
not rated yet May 18, 2017
Cause or effect?

ANd what's new about this? We knew this in the 70's, even if the tech couldn't show the pictures yet, and we knew that norepinephrine is released in fear of the known, and epinephrine in fear of the unknown.

So if they exhibit fear, they are at risk for fear.

Someone got money to show this.
EmceeSquared
not rated yet May 18, 2017
This research is not just pictures of something already known. It is not a conclusion that epinephrine is released in fear of the unknown. Did you read the article?

The research has identified for the first time that people with mental difficulty coping with uncertainty, who feel fear instead of coping, have exceptionally enlarged grey matter in their striatum. Not what you said as the fallacious basis for your specious complaints.

LaPortaMA:
Cause or effect?

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