Educational session helps alleviate distress in prostate cancer patients and their partners

May 19, 2017

In a recent study, an educational session helped alleviate distress equally in both patients with prostate cancer and their partners.

The presence of a at the session did not affect patients' pre- or post-session distress or the success of?the session at alleviating distress. Also, sociodemographic and clinical characteristics had little effect on distress levels.

For the study, 71 patients and 48 partners attended a session that provided information on prostate cancer biology and treatments, as well as the opportunity to consult with a urologist and a simultaneously.

"Our education session was successful at reducing pre-treatment distress among men with prostate cancer. More than that, however, we found that the session was equally effective for partners," said Dr. Lindsay Hedden, lead author of the BJU International study. "This is critical because partners frequently experience higher levels of and anxiety than the men with themselves. Our research underscores the fact that supportive care services should be targeted not only to patients, but to their partners as well." Dr. Hedden also noted that because patients' health status is linked to that of their partners, not attending to partners' needs may be harmful to patients in the long run.

Explore further: For men with prostate cancer, emotional distress may lead to more aggressive treatment

More information: Lindsay Hedden et al, Evaluating an educational intervention to alleviate distress amongst men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer and their partners, BJU International (2017). DOI: 10.1111/bju.13885

Related Stories

For men with prostate cancer, emotional distress may lead to more aggressive treatment

January 11, 2017
The anxiety many men experience after being diagnosed with prostate cancer may lead them to choose potentially unnecessary treatment options, researchers from the University at Buffalo and Roswell Park Cancer Institute report ...

Mindfulness-based Tx doesn't cut distress in prostate cancer

November 29, 2016
(HealthDay)—For men with advanced prostate cancer (PC), mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) does not reduce distress more than minimally enhanced usual care, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in the Journal ...

Shortened radiation therapy offers similar quality of life for low-risk prostate cancer patients

September 26, 2016
Low-risk prostate cancer patients may be able to undergo a shortened course of radiation therapy that cuts treatment by weeks and offers comparable outcomes and quality of life results as those who undergo longer treatment ...

Patients undergoing lung cancer screening experience elevated levels of distress

October 19, 2015
Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) lung cancer screening is recommended to screen patients with an increased risk of developing lung cancer, but little research regarding the emotional toll of screening has been conducted. ...

Emotionally distressed prostate cancer patients more likely to choose surgery, researchers say

June 9, 2015
A study led by the University at Buffalo and Roswell Park Cancer Institute has identified beliefs and personality traits that are associated with higher levels of distress in newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients.

Meaning-centered group therapy beneficial in advanced cancer

February 5, 2015
(HealthDay)—Meaning-centered group psychotherapy (MCGP) is effective for reducing psychological distress and improving spiritual well-being in patients with advanced cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 2 ...

Recommended for you

CAR-T immunotherapy may help blood cancer patients who don't respond to standard treatments

October 20, 2017
Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is one of the first centers nationwide to offer a new immunotherapy that targets certain blood cancers. Newly approved ...

Researchers pinpoint causes for spike in breast cancer genetic testing

October 20, 2017
A sharp rise in the number of women seeking BRCA genetic testing to evaluate their risk of developing breast cancer was driven by multiple factors, including celebrity endorsement, according to researchers at the University ...

Study shows how nerves drive prostate cancer

October 19, 2017
In a study in today's issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels ...

Gene circuit switches on inside cancer cells, triggers immune attack

October 19, 2017
Researchers at MIT have developed a synthetic gene circuit that triggers the body's immune system to attack cancers when it detects signs of the disease.

One to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

October 19, 2017
For the first time, scientists have provided unbiased estimates of the number of mutations needed for cancers to develop, in a study of more than 7,500 tumours across 29 cancer types. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger ...

Researchers target undruggable cancers

October 19, 2017
A new approach to targeting key cancer-linked proteins, thought to be 'undruggable," has been discovered through an alliance between industry and academia.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.