Getting back on track with exercise

May 15, 2017 by Regina B. Wheeler, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—Sometimes life gets in the way of your workout plans. Maybe an illness or an injury got you off track or you took a break from the gym that lasted a little too long. Getting moving again can be challenging, but it's certainly doable—and worthwhile.

First, start slowly. Don't try to log five miles after taking a three-month break from running. The American Council on Exercise suggests walking for 20 to 30 minutes two or three times a week. (This is especially good advice for exercise newbies, too.)

Make exercise a priority again. Schedule it into your week like an appointment—one that you can't cancel. You'll soon redevelop this healthy-lifestyle habit.

A tip from the American Heart Association is to set yourself up for success by finding an exercise buddy who won't let you skip your workouts. You can encourage each other and even celebrate fitness victories together.

Also, figure out why you slacked off in the first place. If going to the gym became just another chore, find an activity you enjoy more—that way you'll be more likely to stick with it. You might be more motivated by or by using home equipment, which doesn't require travel time to a fitness center.

Of course, if a sports injury or a serious health issue sidelined you, ask your doctor for guidelines before restarting exercise after you complete any needed rehab.

Remember, getting back into shape will take time. But taking that first step is the only way to start.

Explore further: Get out there and exercise

More information: The American Council on Exercise details a safe return to a variety of fitness disciplines in its article Jumping Back on the Fitness Bandwagon.

Related Stories

Get out there and exercise

May 1, 2017
(HealthDay)—Everyone's made excuses for skipping exercise. It's too cold outside, you're too busy or you're just too tired to get out of bed.

Exercise guidelines: how much is enough?

April 26, 2017
(HealthDay)—When it comes to exercise, even a modest investment can pay off big time in terms of your health.

How much exercise do you need, and what kind?

April 24, 2015
If you've ever wondered about the benefits of exercise and why we should all try to get our fair share of it, here are some tips:

Exercise: the cellular 'fountain of youth'

March 28, 2017
(HealthDay)—High-intensity exercise may help older adults reverse certain aspects of the "cellular" aging process, a new study suggests.

With kids in school, parents can work out

August 22, 2014
(HealthDay)—Back-to-school time provides an opportunity for parents to develop an exercise plan that fits into the family schedules, an expert suggests.

Researchers find brief, intense stair climbing is a practical way to boost fitness

February 7, 2017
There are no more excuses for being out of shape. Researchers at McMaster University have found that short, intense bursts of stair climbing, which can be done virtually anywhere, have major benefits for heart health.

Recommended for you

Low-fat or low-carb? It's a draw, study finds

February 20, 2018
New evidence from a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine might dismay those who have chosen sides in the low-fat versus low-carb diet debate.

Tobacco kills, no matter how it's smoked: study

February 20, 2018
(HealthDay)—Smokers who think cigars or pipes are somehow safer than cigarettes may want to think again, new research indicates.

Just a few minutes of light intensity exercise linked to lower death risk in older men

February 19, 2018
Clocking up just a few minutes at a time of any level of physical activity, including of light intensity, is linked to a lower risk of death in older men, suggests research published online in the British Journal of Sports ...

Calcium and Vitamin D supplements are not associated with risk of heart attacks

February 16, 2018
New research from the University of Southampton has found no association between the use of calcium or vitamin D supplementation and cardiovascular events such as heart attacks.

Women who clean at home or work face increased lung function decline

February 16, 2018
Women who work as cleaners or regularly use cleaning sprays or other cleaning products at home appear to experience a greater decline in lung function over time than women who do not clean, according to new research published ...

Study shows options to decrease risk of motor vehicle crashes for adolescent drivers

February 16, 2018
Adolescents who receive comprehensive and challenging on-road driving assessments prior to taking the license test might be protected from future motor vehicle crashes, according to a University of Alabama at Birmingham study ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.