Doctors use magnetic stimulation to 'rewire' the brain for people with depression

June 13, 2017
Dr. Andrew Leuchter talks with a patient who is about to undergo transcranial magnetic stimulation, which treats depression by sending magnetic pulses to a specific area of the brain. Credit: UCLA Health

Americans spend billions of dollars each year on antidepressants, but the National Institutes of Health estimates that those medications work for only 60 percent to 70 percent of people who take them. In addition, the number of people with depression has increased 18 percent since 2005, according to the World Health Organization, which this year launched a global campaign encouraging people to seek treatment.

The Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA is one of a handful of hospitals and clinics nationwide that offer a that works in a fundamentally different way than drugs. The technique, , beams targeted magnetic pulses deep inside patients' brains—an approach that has been likened to rewiring a computer.

TMS has been approved by the FDA for treating that doesn't respond to medications, and UCLA researchers say it has been underused. But new equipment being rolled out this summer promises to make the treatment available to more people.

"We are actually changing how the brain circuits are arranged, how they talk to each other," said Dr. Ian Cook, director of the UCLA Depression Research and Clinic Program. "The brain is an amazingly changeable organ. In fact, every time people learn something new, there are physical changes in the brain structure that can be detected."

Nathalie DeGravel, 48, of Los Angeles had tried multiple medications and different types of therapy, not to mention many therapists, for her depression before she heard about magnetic stimulation. She discussed it with her psychiatrist earlier this year, and he readily referred her to UCLA.

Within a few weeks, she noticed relief from the back pain she had been experiencing; shortly thereafter, her depression began to subside. DeGravel says she can now react more "wisely" to life's daily struggles, feels more resilient and is able to do much more around the house. She even updated her resume to start looking for a job for the first time in years.

During TMS therapy, the patient sits in a reclining chair, much like one used in a dentist's office, and a technician places a magnetic stimulator against the patient's head in a predetermined location, based on calibrations from brain imaging.

The stimulator sends a series of into the brain. People who have undergone the treatment commonly report the sensation is like having someone tapping their head, and because of the clicking sound it makes, patients often wear earphones or earplugs during a session.

Credit: University of California, Los Angeles

TMS therapy normally takes 30 minutes to an hour, and people typically receive the treatment several days a week for six weeks. But the newest generation of equipment could make treatments less time-consuming.

"There are new TMS devices recently approved by the FDA that will allow patients to achieve the benefits of the treatment in a much shorter period of time," said Dr. Andrew Leuchter, director of the Semel Institute's TMS clinical and research service. "For some patients, we will have the ability to decrease the length of a treatment session from 37.5 minutes down to 3 minutes, and to complete a whole course of TMS in two weeks."

Leuchter said some studies have shown that TMS is even better than medication for the treatment of chronic depression. The approach, he says, is underutilized.

"We are used to thinking of psychiatric treatments mostly in terms of either talk therapies, psychotherapy or medications," Leuchter said. "TMS is a revolutionary kind of treatment."

Bob Holmes of Los Angeles is one of the 16 million Americans who report having a major depressive episode each year, and he has suffered from depression his entire life. He calls the TMS treatment he received at UCLA Health a lifesaver.

"What this did was sort of reawaken everything, and it provided that kind of jolt to get my to start to work again normally," he said.

Doctors are also exploring whether the treatment could also be used for a variety of other conditions including schizophrenia, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease and chronic pain.

"We're still just beginning to scratch the surface of what this treatment might be able to do for patients with a variety of illnesses," Leuchter said. "It's completely noninvasive and is usually very well tolerated."

Explore further: Study finds non-invasive method that may help speed relief from depression

Related Stories

Study finds non-invasive method that may help speed relief from depression

October 27, 2016
A study by researchers at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA has found a new noninvasive way to predict which individuals will respond favorably to the most commonly used medications to treat ...

Magnetic therapy becoming more popular for treating depression

February 6, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- A new magnetic therapy that treats major depression recently received a major boost when the government announced Medicare will cover the procedure in Illinois.

Noninvasive electrical stimulation may help relieve symptoms of PTSD and depression

February 1, 2016
A new study indicates that a noninvasive treatment that stimulates nerves through an electrical impulse many help patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression.

Scientists show how magnetic pulses change the brain in treatment for depressed patients

August 29, 2015
A group of UK scientists have found a way of understanding how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can give relief to severely depressed patients. TMS is used as an alternative to Electro-Convulsive Therapy (ECT), but ...

Why does the placebo response work in treating depression?

September 11, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—In the past three decades, the power of placebos has gone through the roof in treating major depressive disorder. In clinical trials for treating depression over that period of time, researchers have reported ...

Brain scans may help clinicians choose talk therapy or medication treatment for depression

March 24, 2017
Researchers from Emory University have found that specific patterns of activity on brain scans may help clinicians identify whether psychotherapy or antidepressant medication is more likely to help individual patients recover ...

Recommended for you

New study rebuts the claim that antidepressants do not work

August 18, 2017
A theory that has gained considerable attention in international media, including Newsweek and the CBS broadcast 60 minutes, suggests that antidepressant drugs such as the SSRIs do not exert any actual antidepressant effect. ...

Should I stay or should I leave? Untangling what goes on when a relationship is being questioned

August 17, 2017
Knowing whether to stay in or leave a romantic relationship is often an agonizing experience and that ambivalence can have negative consequences for health and well-being.

Kids learn moral lessons more effectively from stories with humans than human-like animals

August 17, 2017
A study by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto found that four to six-year-olds shared more after listening to books with human characters than books with anthropomorphic ...

History of stress increases miscarriage risk, says new review

August 17, 2017
A history of exposure to psychological stress can increase the risk of miscarriage by upto 42 per cent, according to a new review.

Study finds children pay close attention to potentially threatening information, avoid eye contact when anxious

August 17, 2017
We spend a lot of time looking at the eyes of others for social cues – it helps us understand a person's emotions, and make decisions about how to respond to them. We also know that adults avoid eye contact when anxious. ...

Communicating in a foreign language takes emotion out of decision making

August 16, 2017
If you could save the lives of five people by pushing another bystander in front of a train to his death, would you do it? And should it make any difference if that choice is presented in a language you speak, but isn't your ...

3 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Jun 13, 2017
I would like to know how exactly magnetism 'rewires' the brain. Also how this differs from electroshock. Does that also rewire? Like this
https://medicalxp...tml#nRlv

-by a different name.
Nik_2213
5 / 5 (2) Jun 13, 2017
Sooner the better. Roll out this tech ASAP. Cut down on the marginally beneficial meds, the blood-testing, the oft-grim side-effects of the meds, the ghastly interactions with other meds, the UV sensitivity some cause etc etc etc. And, cheaper by the dozen; line up these units like hair-dryers in a salon...
Please.
gaytanlu6
5 / 5 (1) Jun 13, 2017
whether the treatment could also be used for a variety of other conditions including schizophrenia

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.