Health of the nation presented in 40th annual CDC report

June 30, 2017

(HealthDay)—The health of the United States is summarized in the 40th annual report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Thomas E. Price, M.D., from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and colleagues explored the health of the nation and summarized trends for the last 40 years.

The highlights of the report included an increase in between 1975 and 2015 for the total population; life expectancy declined by 0.1 years for the total population between 2014 and 2015. From 1975 to 2015, there was a decrease in the from 16.07 to 5.90 per 1,000 live births. During the same period, there was a 61 percent decrease in the age-adjusted heart disease rate from 431.2 to 168.5 deaths per 100,000 population and a 21 percent decrease in the age-adjusted cancer death rate from 200.1 to 158.5 per 100,000 population. Heart disease and cancer remain the top causes of death.

Other findings included a 36.9 percent decrease in the age-adjusted prevalence of current cigarette smoking, an increase in the age-adjusted percentage of adults with obesity (from 1988-1994 to 2013-2014), and an increase in prescription drug use for all age groups (from 1988-1994 to 2013-2014).

Explore further: CDC: Heart failure mortality up 2012 through 2014

More information: More Information

Related Stories

CDC: Heart failure mortality up 2012 through 2014

January 4, 2016
(HealthDay)—The age-adjusted mortality rates from heart failure decreased from 2000 to 2012 but increased from 2012 through 2014, according to a December data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and ...

CDC: number of U.S. births up to 3.9 million in 2014

December 23, 2015
(HealthDay)—The number of births in the United States increased in 2014, with an increase in the general fertility rate for the first time since 2007, according to a report published in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control ...

CDC reveals top 5 causes of death

November 17, 2016
(HealthDay)—Heart disease tops the list of what's most likely to kill you or someone you love, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

Black gains in life expectancy

September 22, 2016
In a Viewpoint published online by JAMA, Victor R. Fuchs, Ph.D., Henry J. Kaiser Professor Emeritus, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., discusses the narrowing life-expectancy gap between the U.S. black and white populations ...

Fewer overweight adults report trying to lose weight

March 7, 2017
Although weight gain has continued among U.S. adults, fewer report trying to lose weight, according to a study appearing in the March 7 issue of JAMA.

Findings suggest small increase in obesity among US teens in recent years

June 7, 2016
Among U.S. children and adolescents 2 to 19 years of age, the prevalence of obesity in 2011- 2014 was 17 percent, and over approximately the last 25 years, the prevalence has decreased in children age 2 to 5 years, leveled ...

Recommended for you

Emotional abuse may be linked with menopause misery

November 19, 2018
Smoking, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have long been linked to heightened symptoms of menopause. Now, a study headed by UC San Francisco has identified another factor that may add to menopause torment: an emotionally ...

How AI could help veterinarians code their notes

November 19, 2018
A team led by scientists at the School of Medicine has developed an algorithm that can read the typed-out notes from veterinarians and predict specific diseases that the animal may have.

Bullying and violence at work increases the risk of cardiovascular disease

November 19, 2018
People who are bullied at work or experience violence at work are at higher risk of heart and brain blood vessel problems, including heart attacks and stroke, according to the largest prospective study to investigate the ...

A low-gluten, high-fiber diet may be healthier than gluten-free

November 16, 2018
When healthy people eat a low-gluten and fibre-rich diet compared with a high-gluten diet, they experience less intestinal discomfort including less bloating. Researchers at University of Copenhagen show that this is due ...

Youth dating violence shaped by parents' conflict-handling views, study finds

November 16, 2018
Parents who talk to their children about nonviolent ways of resolving conflict may reduce children's likelihood of physically or psychologically abusing their dating partners later—even when parents give contradictory messages ...

Why we shouldn't like coffee, but we do

November 15, 2018
Why do we like the bitter taste of coffee? Bitterness evolved as a natural warning system to protect the body from harmful substances. By evolutionary logic, we should want to spit it out.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.