Neuroscience

Molecular bodyguards against Parkinson's disease

Chaperone proteins in human cells dynamically interact with the protein α-Synuclein, which is strongly associated with Parkinson's disease. A disturbed relationship to these "bodyguards" leads to cell damage and the formation ...

Medical research

Possible new treatment strategy against progeria

Progeria is a very rare disease that affects about one in 18 million children and results in premature aging and death in adolescence from complications of cardiovascular disease. In a study on mice and human cells, researchers ...

Diabetes

Diabetes cases soar, 1-in-11 adults affected: doctors

More than 460 million people—1-in-11 adults—now suffer from diabetes, largely brought on by an over-rich lifestyle short on exercise, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) said Thursday.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Scientists hail new cystic fibrosis treatment

A new triple-drug therapy that tackles the genetic causes of cystic fibrosis has been shown to be highly effective in treating the rare life-threatening disorder, scientists reported Thursday following landmark clinical trials.

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Life expectancy

Life expectancy is the average number of years of life remaining at a given age. The term is most often used in the human context, but used also in plant or animal ecology and the calculation is based on the analysis of life tables (also known as actuarial tables). The term may also be used in the context of manufactured objects although the related term shelf life is used for consumer products. Life expectancy is heavily dependent on the criteria used to select the group. For example, in countries with high infant mortality rates, the life expectancy at birth is highly sensitive to the rate of death in the first few years of life. In these cases, another measure such as life expectancy at age 5 (e5) can be used to exclude the effects of infant mortality to reveal the effects of causes of death other than early childhood causes.

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