Surf's up! How to plan for a safe beach vacation

June 24, 2017

(HealthDay)—Heading to the beach this summer? Make safety part of your vacation planning.

Sun protection belongs at the top of your packing list. Must-haves include sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

Here are some of the agency's other recommendations:

Don't use tanning beds to pre-tan before a beach vacation. The lamps emit harmful ultraviolet rays that can damage your skin. Also, be aware that spray tans and bronzers do not protect against UV rays.

Make a list of medications you need to take, and get enough to last the trip. Keep your medicines with you when traveling. Also, carry a detailed list of what medicines you take and have your 's contact information in case you need medical care while you're away.

If you wear , pack enough for the entire vacation. Don't forget to take glasses in case your eyes get irritated from your contact lenses. Never expose your contact lenses to saliva or non-sterile water, including that from the tap, bottle or ocean. And remove your contacts before swimming or getting in a hot tub.

Vacation can tempt you to try something new. But, think twice before getting a tattoo. Doing so can put you at risk for serious infections like HIV or hepatitis if unclean tools, practices or products are used. Also, tattoo inks can cause allergic or other bad reactions, the FDA said in a news release.

Be sure to drink plenty of water and to eat healthy. For example, when you're at a buffet, first fill your plate with fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and then add the meat, fish or other protein sources.

Explore further: College women: Have a healthy spring break

More information: The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on travelers' health.

Related Stories

College women: Have a healthy spring break

March 23, 2014
(HealthDay)—Spring break offers college women—and men—a welcome respite from the pressures of school, but they need to make sure they protect their health while having fun.

There's no such thing as a safe, healthy tan

June 8, 2017
Dear Mayo Clinic: My daughter wanted to go to a tanning bed before prom, but, instead, she opted for a spray tan. But a lot of her friends are going to a tanning bed and think it's relatively safe. Is there such a thing as ...

Most contact lens wearers take chances with their eyes: CDC

August 20, 2015
(HealthDay)—Most contact lens wearers close their eyes to safety recommendations, a new U.S. government study finds.

Choosing the right sunglasses

June 23, 2017
(HealthDay)—You might think of eye problems like cataracts as signs of old age, but one step you can take now will protect your vision for the future—and you can do it with style.

Kids' sun safety means 'slip, slap, slop'

April 28, 2017
(HealthDay)—Children spend a lot of time outside in the summer, so parents need to stay on top of their sun protection, a skin cancer expert advises.

Don't take shortcuts when caring for contact lenses, expert says

November 24, 2012
(HealthDay)—Common shortcuts people take when caring for their contact lenses could have serious consequences, such as infections or ulcerations, according to an eye disease expert.

Recommended for you

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.