Biting and chewing gets you teeth

June 29, 2017, Freshscience

Biting and chewing force our buried teeth to emerge, not an innate 'eruptive' force from within the bone of the jaw as previously thought, according to biomechanical modelling done by Babak Sarrafpour and an interdisciplinary team working at the University of Sydney.

Around the age of six months, our first set of emerge from our . Then around eight years of age, our second set of teeth emerges.

But there has been little clinical evidence of why our teeth emerge from our jaws.

Babak created a 3-D computer model of an eight-year old's jaw showing the strains and forces within the bone of the human jaw as it bites and chews.

The modelling showed that forces created within the jaw cause deformation of the thin layer of soft tissue that surrounds teeth that are still buried inside the jaw, and it is this tissue deformation that forces the teeth outwards.

The new biomechanical theory is more consistent with clinical and experimental observations than earlier theories.

The results of this study have been published in the prestigious multidisciplinary journal PLoS One.

Further work aims towards novel computer-aided therapies and improved orthodontic outcomes.

Computer modelling of an eight-year old’s jaw shows biting and chewing drive our teeth to emerge.

Explore further: Need braces? Say goodbye to 'metal-mouth' taunts

Related Stories

Need braces? Say goodbye to 'metal-mouth' taunts

June 23, 2017
(HealthDay)—Braces have long been a kind of geeky right-of-passage—something that must be endured for a few years to ensure a lifelong smile with straight teeth.

Tooth loss linked to an increased risk of dementia

March 8, 2017
In a study of 1566 community-dwelling Japanese elderly who were followed for 5 years, the risk of developing dementia was elevated in individuals with fewer remaining teeth.

Shark study reveals taste buds were key to evolution of teeth

January 18, 2017
The first creatures to evolve teeth didn't have jaws. Many scientists believe these ancient fish developed the first tooth-like structures on their skin that were similar to the "denticle" scales that still cover sharks ...

Multiplying teeth

December 18, 2015
Researchers from the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, working with colleagues from the Tokyo Medical and Dental University, have found a way to—literally—multiply teeth. In mice, they were able to extract teeth ...

Recommended for you

Toothpaste alone does not prevent dental erosion or hypersensitivity

March 14, 2018
The rising prevalence of dental erosion and dentin hypersensitivity has led to the emergence of more toothpastes that claim to treat these problems. While no such toothpaste existed 20 years ago, today, many such brands are ...

Study: Absence of key protein, TTP, rapidly turns young bones old

March 10, 2018
The absence of a protein critical to the control of inflammation may lead to rapid and severe bone loss, according to a new University at Buffalo study.

Sipping hot fruit teas can lead to tooth erosion

February 26, 2018
An investigation by scientists at King's College London into why some people suffer tooth erosion while others don't has found that it's not just what they eat and drink, but how they eat and drink, that increases their chances ...

Lack of guidance may delay a child's first trip to the dentist

February 19, 2018
Without a doctor or dentist's guidance, some parents don't follow national recommendations for early dental care for their children, a new national poll finds.

Researcher uses stem cells to attack bacteria and regenerate dental pulp

February 7, 2018
Emi Shimizu's research could someday transform a procedure dental patients dread: the root canal.

Cavity prevention approach effectively reduces tooth decay

January 22, 2018
A scientifically based approach that includes a tooth-decay risk assessment, aggressive preventive measures and conservative restorations can dramatically reduce decay in community dental practices, according to a study by ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.