Tourette-like tics vanish in mice treated with histamine

June 6, 2017 by Bill Hathaway, Yale University
Tourette-like tics vanish in mice treated with histamine
The activity of neurons in the striatum are regulated by neurotransmitter histamine and is associated with Tourette-like grooming behavior in mice. Credit: Yale University

Yale scientists produced increased grooming behavior in mice that may model tics in Tourette syndrome and discovered these behaviors vanish when histamine—a neurotransmitter most commonly associated with allergies—is introduced into their brains.

The research, published the week of June 5 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reaffirms previous genetic studies that linked histamine production and Tourette, an often serious neuropsychological disorder marked by motor and .

"The intriguing thing is we were able to reverse this behavior in ," said Chris Pittenger, associate professor of psychiatry and senior author of the study. "It is easier to imagine how this insight might develop into a treatment than if the abnormalities arose during early development."

The researchers were able to trigger excessive grooming in mice by shutting down histamine neurons projecting to the basal ganglia, an area of the brain previously linked to Tourette. They could reverse the behavior by reintroducing histamine directly into the striatum, confirming that this structure is a central contributor to the pathology.

Histamine's role in immunological reactions such as allergies has been intensively studied, but in recent years the neurotransmitter histamine in the brain has been linked to a variety of conditions, such as Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, autism and , as well as Tourette syndrome.

Explore further: Researchers find rare genetic cause of Tourette syndrome

More information: Maximiliano Rapanelli et al. Histamine modulation of the basal ganglia circuitry in the development of pathological grooming, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1704547114

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BubbaNicholson
1 / 5 (2) Jun 06, 2017
"Increased grooming behavior" is stimulated by a pheromone deficiency, because allogrooming exists only for social exchanges of fur pheromones. Before injecting histamine into human brains, try oral administration of 250mg of healthy adult male facial skin surface lipid pheromone, please. The required pheromone is literally on the very noses of male neurosurgeons, just transfer it to chewing gum and give the gum to the Tourette's patient using a gravimetric balance to keep track. One such oral dose of a man's face grease diminished tics from 12 beats per minute to 7 beats per minute, two of which were torticollis from being drugged by psychiatrists. Of course, without knowing the patient or the disease, this may be artifact. That patient was lost to follow up and I've had no further experience with Tourette's.
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (2) Jun 07, 2017
@fraudulent bubba the pseudoscience cult "oxymoronic" quack
Before injecting histamine into human brains, try oral administration of 250mg of healthy adult male facial skin surface lipid pheromone
so... you want people to literally refuse an evidence backed scientific experiment in order to experiment with your delusional belief about pheromones?

you can't even prove pheromones exist (See: http://rspb.royal...full.pdf )

so why should anyone believe you when you can't produce any empirical evidence that can be validated?

fraud is illegal in the US, so stop advocating for a known psychotropic when you can't even establish that your treatments are based on science

PROTIP: when you can't produce science for your science claims, it then means you're promoting religion

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