Investigational vaccine protected monkeys from HIV-like virus

June 8, 2017
Credit: National Cancer Institute

Building on insights from an HIV vaccine regimen in humans that had partial success during a phase 3 clinical trial in Thailand, a Duke-led research team used a more-is-better approach in monkeys that appeared to improve vaccine protection from an HIV-like virus.

Adding three more targets to the investigational , for a total of five, protected more than half of the vaccinated animals from simian-human immunodeficiency infection.

"The vaccine regimen tested in the Thai trial, known as RV144, had 31-percent efficacy and is the only HIV investigational vaccine regimen to have demonstrated even modest protection from HIV infection," said Barton F. Haynes, M.D., director of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute and senior author of a study published online June 8 in the journal Nature Communications. "In this study in monkeys, we increased that level of protection to 55 percent by using a pentavalent (five-part) vaccine."

Haynes and colleagues—including Bette T. Korber of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, who led the vaccine design—started from the foundation used in the RV144 human vaccine trial in Thailand, adding targets that elicited antibody responses to regions of the HIV envelope.

Those antibodies were fairly easy to induce, Haynes said. By adding the three additional regions of the viral envelope to the investigational vaccine, the researchers improved the level of protection afforded to animals exposed to a difficult-to-neutralize strain of the simian virus, which is comparable to HIV.

"Vaccine protection using this model of virus infection in primates is possible," said lead author Todd Bradley, Ph.D., a member of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute. "This is a proof-of-concept that provides a strategy to improve upon the first HIV vaccine regimen that provided limited protection in people."

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4 comments

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Porgie
not rated yet Jun 08, 2017
What a waste of money. Why not try to find the cure for diabetes it kills more people that aids. Aids is the liberal disease.
MarsBars
not rated yet Jun 10, 2017
@Porgie - why not cure both? Diseases ignore politics.
rebeccafr2
not rated yet Jun 11, 2017
HIV vaccine regimen that provided limited protection in people
rebeccafr2
not rated yet Jun 11, 2017
I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes and put on Metformin on June 26th, 2016. I started the ADA diet and followed it 100% for a few weeks and could not get my blood sugar to go below 140. Finally I began to panic and called my doctor, he told me to get used to it. He said I would be on metformin my whole life and eventually insulin. At that point i knew something wasn't right and began to do lots of research. Then I found Lisa's diabetes story http://myhealthli...et-only/ I read that article from end to end because everything the writer was saying made absolute sense. I started the diet that day and the next morning my blood sugar was down to 100 and now i have a fasting blood sugar between Mid 70's and the 80's. My doctor took me off the metformin after just three week of being on this lifestyle change. I have lost over 30 pounds and 6+ inches around my waist in a month. The truth is we can get off the drugs and help myself by trying natural methods

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