Review: Little evidence on vitamin D-allergy association

July 13, 2017

(HealthDay)—Vitamin D supplementation seems not to prevent allergies in pregnant women, breastfeeding women, or infants, though there is very little evidence about the association between vitamin D and allergic diseases, according to a review published online July 4 in Allergy.

Juan José Yepes-Nuñez, M.D., from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, and colleagues conducted a systematic review to examine the efficacy and safety of vitamin D supplementation in , breastfeeding women, infants, and children for the prevention of allergies. Data were included from one and four nonrandomized studies.

The researchers found that based on very low certainty in the body of evidence across examined studies, vitamin D supplementation may not reduce the risk of developing such as atopic dermatitis in pregnant women; allergic rhinitis in pregnant women and infants; asthma and/or wheezing in pregnant women, breastfeeding women, and infants; or food allergies in pregnant women. There were no studies relating to primary prevention of allergic diseases in children.

"Limited information is available addressing of allergic diseases after vitamin D supplementation and its potential impact remains uncertain," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the nutrition industry.

Explore further: Vitamin D levels not linked to asthma or dermatitis

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