Infant mortality disparity grows in Appalachia, study finds

August 7, 2017

A new study shows a growing disparity between infant mortality and life expectancy rates in Appalachia compared with the rest of the country.

The study was published in the August issue of Health Affairs. It compared infant mortality and life expectancy rates in Appalachia with the rest of the United States between 1990 and 2013.

The study found that while the rate in Appalachia was close to that of the rest of the country in 1990, by 2013 the rate 16 percent higher in the 13-state region. Also, the study found life expectancy in Appalachia to be about 2.4 years less than the rest of the country.

The study blamed the disparity on a number of issues, including smoking, drug use and accidental deaths such as car accidents.

Explore further: Appalachian infant death rates point to healthcare deficit

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