Insufficient sleep may lead to increased risk-taking behavior

August 25, 2017

(HealthDay)—Chronic sleep restriction may lead to risk-seeking behavior, according to a study published online Aug. 21 in the Annals of Neurology.

Angelina Maric, from University Hospital Zurich, and colleagues assessed financial risk-taking after seven consecutive nights of and after one night of acute sleep deprivation versus a regular sleep condition in a within-subject design.

The researchers found that chronic sleep restriction increases risk seeking, although this was not observed after acute sleep deprivation. This increase was unnoticed subjectively but was measured by locally lower values of slow wave energy during preceding sleep, an electrophysiological marker of sleep intensity and restoration, in electrodes over the right prefrontal cortex.

"In chronically sleep restricted subjects, low slow wave sleep intensity over the right prefrontal cortex—which has been shown to be linked to risk behavior—may lead to increased and subjectively unnoticed risk seeking," the authors write.

Explore further: How much sleep do you really need?

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

How much sleep do you really need?

July 20, 2017
(HealthDay)—Health initiatives typically center on diet and fitness. But the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society state that getting enough sleep is just as important as eating right and exercising.

Snooze your way to better health

January 29, 2016
Sleeping in on weekends need not be a guilty pleasure.

Prolonged shortened sleep increases blood pressure at night

March 13, 2015
People exposed to prolonged periods of shortened sleep have significant increases in blood pressure during nighttime hours, Mayo Clinic researchers report in a small study of eight participants.

Developing brain regions in children hardest hit by sleep deprivation

October 4, 2016
A team of researchers from the University of Zurich has studied the effects of acute sleep deprivation in children for the first time. They discovered that the brain in five to 12-year-olds responds differently to sleep deprivation ...

Recommended for you

Gene immunotherapy protects against multiple sclerosis in mice

September 21, 2017
A potent and long-lasting gene immunotherapy approach prevents and reverses symptoms of multiple sclerosis in mice, according to a study published September 21st in the journal Molecular Therapy. Multiple sclerosis is an ...

Neuron types in brain are defined by gene activity shaping their communication patterns

September 21, 2017
In a major step forward in research, scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) today publish in Cell a discovery about the molecular-genetic basis of neuronal cell types. Neurons are the basic building blocks that ...

Highly precise wiring in the cerebral cortex

September 21, 2017
Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the cerebral cortex of mammals, where, among other things, vision, thoughts or spatial ...

Your neurons register familiar faces, whether you notice them or not

September 21, 2017
When people see an image of a person they recognize—the famous tennis player Roger Federer or actress Halle Berry, for instance—particular cells light up in the brain. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on ...

Faulty cell signaling derails cerebral cortex development, could it lead to autism?

September 20, 2017
As the embryonic brain develops, an incredibly complex cascade of cellular events occur, starting with progenitors - the originating cells that generate neurons and spur proper cortex development. If this cascade malfunctions ...

Strategy might prevent infections in patients with spinal cord injuries

September 19, 2017
New research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found a potential therapeutic strategy to prevent infections in patients with spinal cord injuries.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

BubbaNicholson
1 / 5 (1) Aug 26, 2017
Two symptoms. Risk taking should increase against sleep deprivation like air-seeking should increase against air deprivation.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.