Psoriasis and psychiatric illnesses—what are the links?

August 11, 2017

A new review examines the potential link between psoriasis and mental health conditions.

Psoriasis can be a socially isolating disease due to debilitating physical symptoms and the stigma patients feel because of the appearance of their skin. Anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation and behavior are prevalent in these individuals.

Evidence suggests that inflammatory molecules—such as interleukin 1 and interleukin 6, which are elevated in both psoriasis and depression—may underlie the relationship between and mental health comorbidities.

The review is published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

Explore further: Psoriasis, risk of depression in the US population

More information: J. Koo et al. Depression and suicidality in psoriasis: review of the literature including the cytokine theory of depression, Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (2017). DOI: 10.1111/jdv.14460

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