Adhesive pads improve wrinkles in crow's feet area

September 10, 2017

(HealthDay)—Adhesive pads may improve wrinkles in the crow's feet area, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

Vittorio Mazzarello, M.D., from the University of Sassari in Italy, and colleagues conducted a placebo-controlled study involving 39 subjects to examine the anti-wrinkle action of adhesive pads. Measurements were taken at 15, 30, and 60 minutes after 30-minute application of the pads; the measurements were also taken after subjects wore pads every night for four weeks in a long-term test.

The researchers found that there was no significant change in any of the parameters analyzed after 15, 30, and 60 minutes in the short- and long-term tests analyzing the average of the elastomeric measurements. All roughness parameters were reduced with adhesive pads at 15 minutes after short-term application and until 60 minutes after long-term application. In the contralateral untreated zone, these changes did not occur.

"The use of topical adhesive pads improves wrinkles in the crow's feet area in the first hour after use," the authors write. "However, patient self-evaluation indicated that the use of topical adhesive pads for three weeks may offer subjective improvement in [the] crow's zone over a two-hour period. Topical adhesive pads are safe to use and tolerable for most users."

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