Vitamin D levels in blood may help predict risk of multiple sclerosis

September 13, 2017
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Examining vitamin D levels in the blood may help predict whether a person is at risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a large new study published in the September 13, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

"There have only been a few small studies suggesting that levels of vitamin D in the blood can predict risk," said study author Kassandra Munger, ScD, of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. "Our study, involving a large number of , suggests that correcting vitamin D deficiency in young and middle-age women may reduce their future risk of MS."

For the study, researchers used a repository of from more than 800,000 women in Finland, taken as part of prenatal testing. Then the researchers identified 1,092 women who were diagnosed with MS an average of nine years after giving the blood samples. They were compared to 2,123 women who did not develop the disease.

Deficient levels of vitamin D were defined as fewer than 30 nanomoles per liter (nmol/L). Insufficient levels were 30 to 49 nmol/L and adequate levels were 50 nmol/L or higher.

Of the women who developed MS, 58 percent had deficient levels of vitamin D, compared to 52 percent of the women who did not develop the disease.

Researchers found that with each 50 nmol/L increase in vitamin D levels in the blood, the risk of developing MS later in life decreased by 39 percent. In addition, women who had deficient levels of vitamin D had a 43 percent higher risk of developing MS than women who had adequate levels as well as a 27 percent higher risk than women with insufficient levels.

"More research is needed on the optimal dose of vitamin D for reducing risk of MS," said Munger. "But striving to achieve D sufficiency over the course of a person's life will likely have multiple health benefits."

Limitations of the study include that participants were primarily white women and therefore the findings may not be the same for other racial groups or men. Also, while the blood samples were taken an average of nine years before MS diagnosis, it is possible some women may have already had MS when was drawn and were not yet showing symptoms of the disease.

Explore further: Vitamin D status in newborns and risk of MS in later life

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megamarc1
not rated yet Sep 16, 2017
Vitamin D levels are really a surrogate measurement for sun exposure, and studies now show that sun exposure reduces the risk of MS with or without high vitamin D levels. Recent research has shown that exposure to sunlight may result in immune tolerance beneficial for MS through upregulation of T and B regulatory cells, enhanced levels of cis-urocanic acid, alterations in dendritic cell trafficking as well as release of a range of other cytokines and chemokines. This research is important because it shows how sun exposure works against MS in several different ways, only one of which may be the stimulation of vitamin D production. Vitamin D may be only one part of the MS puzzle. A holistic view of sun exposure is, in my opinion, always better than separating our one photoproduct (vitamin D) from a host of beneficial chemicals produced by exposure to the sun.

For more information, see the Sunlight Institute web site. (org)

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