Crisaborole safe for long-term treatment of atopic dermatitis

October 11, 2017

(HealthDay)—Crisaborole ointment appears to be safe for the long-term treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Lawrence F. Eichenfield, M.D., from Rady Children's Hospital in San Diego, and colleagues assessed the long-term safety results from a multicenter, open-label, 48-week safety study of 517 ≥2 years of age with mild to moderate AD who continued crisaborole treatment after completing a 28-day phase 3 pivotal study.

The researchers found that during the pivotal study and the open-label trial, 65 percent of patients reported at least one treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE), most of which were mild (51.2 percent) or moderate (44.6 percent) and considered unrelated to treatment (93.1 percent). There was consistency with regard to the frequency and severity of TEAEs. Overall, treatment-related AEs were reported in 10.2 percent of patients and most commonly included dermatitis atopic (3.1 percent), application-site pain (2.3 percent), and application-site infection (1.2 percent). Because of TEAEs, nine patients (1.7 percent) discontinued the long-term study.

"Crisaborole ointment had a low frequency of treatment-related AEs over 48 weeks of of patients with AD," conclude the authors.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry, including Anacor Pharmaceuticals, which funded the study.

Explore further: Secukinumab effective for moderate / severe scalp psoriasis

More information: Abstract/Full Text

Related Stories

Secukinumab effective for moderate / severe scalp psoriasis

September 29, 2017
(HealthDay)—Secukinumab is safe and effective as a treatment for patients with extensive moderate-to-severe scalp psoriasis, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of ...

IgE allergy testing improves atopic dermatitis outcomes

July 6, 2017
(HealthDay)—Identification of allergens by immunoglobulin E (IgE) testing improves outcomes in atopic dermatitis, according to a study published online June 20 in the International Journal of Dermatology.

Human breast milk effective for atopic dermatitis in infants

July 25, 2015
(HealthDay)—Topical application of human breast milk (HBM) is effective for infants with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis, according to a study published in the August issue of the International Journal of Dermatology.

Systemic corticosteroids discouraged for atopic dermatitis

September 26, 2017
(HealthDay)—Routine use of systemic corticosteroids is generally discouraged for atopic dermatitis, according to research published online Sept. 2 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Dupilumab effective in atopic dermatitis

October 4, 2016
(HealthDay)—Dupilumab is effective for patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis that is inadequately controlled by topical treatment, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the New England Journal of ...

Efficacy of wet wrap therapy for atopic dermatitis undetermined

November 14, 2016
(HealthDay)—Evidence that wet wrap therapy (WWT) is more effective than topical steroids for the treatment of atopic dermatitis is mixed, according to a review published online Nov. 8 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Recommended for you

Study seeks to aid diagnosis, management of catatonia

December 11, 2017
Catatonia, a syndrome of motor, emotional and behavioral abnormalities frequently characterized by muscular rigidity and a trance-like mental stupor and at times manifesting with great excitement or agitation, can occur during ...

New compound stops progressive kidney disease in its tracks

December 7, 2017
Progressive kidney diseases, whether caused by obesity, hypertension, diabetes, or rare genetic mutations, often have the same outcome: The cells responsible for filtering the blood are destroyed. Reporting today in Science, ...

New Lyme disease tests could offer quicker, more accurate detection

December 7, 2017
New tests to detect early Lyme disease - which is increasing beyond the summer months -could replace existing tests that often do not clearly identify the infection before health problems occur.

Spinal tap needle type impacts the risk of complications

December 6, 2017
The type of needle used during a lumbar puncture makes a significant difference in the subsequent occurrence of headache, nerve irritation and hearing disturbance in patients, according to a study by Hamilton medical researchers.

Men with HPV are 20 times more likely to be reinfected after one year

December 5, 2017
A new analysis of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) in men shows that infection with one HPV type strongly increases the risk of reinfection with the same type. In fact, men who are infected with the type responsible for ...

New tuberculosis drugs possible with understanding of old antibiotic

December 5, 2017
Tuberculosis, and other life-threatening microbial diseases, could be more effectively tackled with future drugs, thanks to new research into an old antibiotic by the University of Warwick and The Francis Crick Institute.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.