Six-month tai chi program improves physical activity in CHD

October 12, 2017

(HealthDay)—A six-month tai chi program is safe and improves physical activity (PA), weight, and quality of life for patients with coronary heart disease who decline to enroll in cardiac rehabilitation, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Elena Salmoirago-Blotcher, M.D., Ph.D., from the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and colleagues conducted a phase 2 trial to examine the feasibility, safety, and acceptability of a tai chi intervention and to assess its effects on PA, fitness, weight, and quality of life among patients with declining enrollment. Participants were randomized to a "LITE" condition (two sessions per week for 12 weeks; 16 participants) or a "PLUS" condition (three sessions per week for 12 weeks and then maintenance classes for 12 weeks; 13 participants).

The researchers found that retention at nine months was 90 and 88 percent for LITE and PLUS, respectively. There were no serious tai chi-related adverse events. There were significant mean between-group differences favoring the PLUS group at three and six months for moderate-to-vigorous PA (100.33 and 111.62 minutes per week, respectively), with a trend toward significance at nine months; for the percentage change in weight; and for quality of life. Within and between groups there were no changes in aerobic fitness.

"Tai chi could be an effective option to improve PA in this high-risk population," the authors write.

One author is founder and sole owner of the Tree of Life Tai Chi Center.

Explore further: Tai chi holds promise as cardiac rehab exercise

More information: Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Related Stories

Tai chi holds promise as cardiac rehab exercise

October 11, 2017
The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation, according to preliminary research in Journal of the American Heart Association, ...

Heart disease exercise programme could work for bowel cancer patients

September 28, 2016
Could rehabilitation programmes for heart disease patients be used to help people recovering from bowel cancer get back on their feet? That's the question cancer care experts at the University of Stirling have been exploring.

'Open gym' format shortens waiting time for cardiac rehab

August 30, 2017
Changing from scheduled appointments to an "open gym" format can reduce waiting times for cardiac rehabilitation, reports a study in the September/October issue of Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention. ...

OPTICARE trial enhanced cardiac rehab programs help heart attack patients, but do not decrease cardiovascular risk

August 29, 2016
Enhanced cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs that include a year of group or personal lifestyle and fitness coaching did not improve cardiovascular risk scores more than a standard 3-month program in patients recovering ...

Early rehab doesn't increase adverse events post-CABG

February 5, 2015
(HealthDay)—Early enrollment in cardiac rehabilitation does not increase major adverse event rates among patients who recently underwent open heart surgery, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American ...

Rehab helps heart patients live longer -- but they have to show up

October 23, 2011
Cardiac rehabilitation boosts longevity, especially in patients with the lowest fitness levels, Dr. Billie-Jean Martin today told the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress 2011, co-hosted by the Heart and Stroke Foundation and ...

Recommended for you

Physical activity necessary to maintain heart-healthy lifestyle

September 24, 2018
Exercise and physical activity are of vast global importance to prevent and control the increasing problem of heart disease and stroke, according to a review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of ...

Height may be risk factor for varicose veins, study finds

September 24, 2018
The taller you are, the more likely you are to develop varicose veins, according to a study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers that examined the genes of more than 400,000 people in search of clues ...

Prosthetic valve mismatches common in transcatheter valve replacement, ups risk of death

September 24, 2018
In the largest multi-institutional study to date, led by researchers from Penn Medicine, the team found that among patients who underwent a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a high number experienced severe and ...

Study reveals a promising alternative to corticosteroids in acute renal failure treatment

September 21, 2018
A protein produced by the human body appears to be a promising new drug candidate to treat conditions that lead to acute renal failure. This is shown by a study conducted at São Paulo State University (UNESP) in São José ...

Can a common heart condition cause sudden death?

September 20, 2018
About one person out of 500 has a heart condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This condition causes thickening of the heart muscle and results in defects in the heart's electrical system. Under conditions ...

New drugs could reduce risk of heart disease when added to statins

September 20, 2018
New drugs that lower levels of triglycerides (a type of fat) in blood could further reduce the risk of heart attack when added to statins. These new drugs, which are in various stages of development, could also reduce blood ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.