Vitamin E in early childhood tied to lower ALT levels later

November 27, 2017

(HealthDay)—Higher early childhood intake of alpha-tocopherol is associated with lower odds of elevated mid-childhood alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, according to a study published online Nov. 9 in Hepatology.

Jennifer A. Woo Baidal, M.D., M.P.H., from the Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues evaluated the extent to which vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) intake early in is associated with ALT levels later in childhood. Mothers of 528 children completed a validated food frequency questionnaire during early childhood visits (median 3.1 years), while blood and anthropometric data were collected at a mid-childhood visit (median 7.6 years).

The researchers found that mean alpha-tocopherol intake was 3.7 mg/day in early childhood. Mean body mass index (BMI) z-score was 0.41 units and 22 percent of children had an elevated ALT level at the mid-childhood evaluation. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models showed that there were lower odds of elevated mid-childhood ALT (adjusted odds ratio, 0.62; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.39 to 0.99) for quartiles 2 through 4 versus the lowest quartile in children with higher early childhood vitamin E intake. Even after accounting for diet, the trend persisted (adjusted odds ratio, 0.62; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.36 to 1.08) and was strengthened after accounting for mid-childhood BMI z-score (adjusted odds ratio, 0.56; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.32 to 0.99).

"Our findings suggest that modifiable risk factors, specifically intake of vitamin E, should be considered in future interventions to identify approaches to prevent pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease," the authors write.

Explore further: Sport sampling in children tied to more exercise in adolescence

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Sport sampling in children tied to more exercise in adolescence

November 15, 2017
(HealthDay)—Sport sampling in childhood may be associated with higher physical activity (PA) levels during adolescence, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in Pediatrics.

Childhood adiposity linked to later risk of fatty liver disease

March 29, 2017
(HealthDay)—Childhood adiposity is associated with increased odds of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to a study published online March 29 in Pediatrics.

No link for tea, coffee intake with barrett's esophagus

May 5, 2016
(HealthDay)—After adjustment for confounding variables there is no correlation between the risk of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and tea or coffee consumption, according to a study published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology ...

High protein intake in early childhood is associated with higher body fat mass but not higher lean mass

May 20, 2017
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (17-20) May shows that a high intake of protein in early childhood, particularly from animal food sources, is associated with a higher ...

Multivitamin use may cut risk of chemo-induced neuropathy

September 13, 2017
(HealthDay)—Multivitamin use before diagnosis of breast cancer is associated with reduced risk of symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in the Journal of the ...

Vitamin K-1 intake tied to heart structure, function in teens

October 9, 2017
(HealthDay)—For adolescents, phylloquinone (vitamin K-1) intake is associated with left ventricular (LV) structure and function, according to a study published in the October issue of The Journal of Nutrition.

Recommended for you

India launches 'Modicare', world's biggest health scheme

September 23, 2018
Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday launched the world's biggest health insurance scheme, promising free coverage for half a billion of India's poorest citizens ahead of national elections next year.

Patient-centered visual aid helps physicians discuss risks, treatments with parents

September 21, 2018
A series of illustrations and charts designed as decision aids for parents of children with minor head injuries helped them communicate with emergency medicine physicians and make informed decisions about their child's care, ...

Alcohol responsible for one in 20 deaths worldwide: WHO

September 21, 2018
Alcohol kills three million people worldwide each year—more than AIDS, violence and road accidents combined, the World Health Organization said Friday, adding that men are particularly at risk.

Smart pills dumb down medical care, experts warn

September 21, 2018
Enthusiasm for an emerging digital health tool, the smart pill, is on the rise but researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have published a paper in the American Journal of Bioethics that cautions health care ...

Crunched for time? High-intensity exercise = same cell benefits in fewer minutes

September 20, 2018
A few minutes of high-intensity interval or sprinting exercise may be as effective as much longer exercise sessions in spurring beneficial improvements in mitochondrial function, according to new research. The small study ...

China's doctor shortage prompts rush for AI health care

September 20, 2018
Qu Jianguo, 64, had a futuristic medical visit in Shanghai as he put his wrist through an automated pulse-taking machine and received the result within two minutes on a mobile phone—without a doctor present.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.