FDA approves once-monthly injection for opioid addiction

December 4, 2017

(HealthDay)—Sublocade, a once-monthly injection of buprenorphine to treat opioid use disorder, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Buprenorphine has been shown to reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms and the desire to use opioids, "without causing the cycle of highs and lows associated with or abuse," the FDA said.

Sublocade was evaluated in involving 848 adults who were diagnosed with moderate-to-severe cases of opioid use disorder. The most common side effects included constipation, nausea, vomiting, headache, drowsiness, and injection-site pain. Sublocade's safety and effectiveness were not evaluated in individuals under age 17, the FDA said.

The maker of Sublocade—Indivior—is required to conduct additional studies to see if some patients could benefit from a dose of Sublocade that's higher than currently approved.

Indivior is based in the United Kingdom.

Explore further: Clinical trial looks at tramadol for opioid withdrawal

More information: More Information

Related Stories

Clinical trial looks at tramadol for opioid withdrawal

July 12, 2017
A randomized clinical trial published by JAMA Psychiatry compared tramadol extended-release with clonidine and buprenorphine for the management of opioid withdrawal symptoms in patients with opioid use disorder in a residential ...

Injectable therapy blocks opioid euphoria, withdrawal symptoms in trial

June 26, 2017
A study led by investigators in the University of Kentucky Center on Drug and Alcohol Research (CDAR) has demonstrated a weekly injectable formulation of buprenorphine, CAM2038, suppresses symptoms of withdrawal in patients ...

Movantik approved for constipation from opioids

September 16, 2014
(HealthDay)—Movantik (naloxegol) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat opioid-induced constipation, the agency said Tuesday.

Gabapentin co-use may increase risk of fatal opioid overdose

October 3, 2017
Co-prescription of the anticonvulsant gabapentin is associated with an increased risk of opioid-related death in people who are prescribed opioid painkillers, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine.

FDA asks maker of opioid painkiller opana ER to pull drug from market

June 9, 2017
(HealthDay)—Sales of reformulated Opana ER, a prescription opioid painkiller, should be halted in the United States, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

Why are doctors underusing a drug to treat opioid addiction?

August 3, 2017
A drug approved for private physicians to treat opioid addiction is being underprescribed, and a survey of addiction specialists suggests that many of them are not willing to increase their use of it, despite an expanding ...

Recommended for you

Complex inhalers prevent patients from taking medicine

February 23, 2018
Respiratory disease patients with arthritis could struggle to manage their conditions because their inhalers are too fiddly for them to use, University of Bath research has found.

Opioid abuse leads to heroin use and a hepatitis C epidemic, researcher says

February 22, 2018
Heroin is worse than other drugs because people inject it much sooner, potentially resulting in increased risk of injection-related epidemics such as hepatitis C and HIV, a Keck School of Medicine of USC study shows.

Opioid addiction treatment behind bars reduced post-incarceration overdose deaths in RI

February 14, 2018
A treatment program for opioid addiction launched by the Rhode Island Department of Corrections was associated with a significant drop in post-incarceration drug overdose deaths and contributed to an overall drop in overdose ...

Heroin vaccine blocks lethal overdose

February 14, 2018
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have achieved a major milestone toward designing a safe and effective vaccine to both treat heroin addiction and block lethal overdose of the drug. Their research, published ...

Study shows NIH spent >$100 billion on basic science for new medicines

February 12, 2018
Federally funded research contributed to the science underlying all new medicines approved by the FDA over the past six years, according to a new study by Bentley University.

Opioid use increases risk of serious infections

February 12, 2018
Opioid users have a significantly increased risk of infections severe enough to require treatment at the hospital, such as pneumonia and meningitis, as compared to people who don't use opioids.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.