Storage in dose administration aids doesn't affect warfarin

December 4, 2017

(HealthDay)—The chemical stability of warfarin sodium tablets is not affected by repackaging into dose administration aids (DAAs), according to a study published online Nov. 16 in the Journal of Pharmacy Practice and Research.

Caynan Mendes Rugno, B.Pharm., from RMIT University in Bundoora, Australia, and colleagues examined the of sodium tablets stored in DAAs and original packaging over an eight-week period. Tablets were removed from the original packaging and repackaged into DAAs; DAAs and original packages were stored at controlled room temperature (25 degrees Celsius; 60 percent relative humidity [RH]), accelerated (40 degrees Celsius/75 percent RH), and uncontrolled room temperature conditions (19 to 21 degrees Celsius/38 to 50 percent RH). A validated high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to assess the chemical stability.

The researchers found that at eight weeks there was no significant change in warfarin content. When stored at accelerated and controlled room temperature conditions there was a significant increase in hardness. At eight weeks, hardness of tablets stored in original packaging was comparable to that of those stored in DAAs. Compared with baseline, there was a significant difference in the dissolution profile of tablets stored in original containers at accelerated conditions for eight weeks.

"Repackaging of warfarin sodium tablets into DAAs does not affect the ," the authors write. "However, tablets should be stored in a cool, dry place to minimize the effects on physical properties."

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