Easing your child's asthma

February 6, 2018 by Julie Davis, Healthday Reporter

(HealthDay)—If your child is among the 10 percent of kids with asthma, you want to do everything you can to control it.

Start by working with your child's allergist to identify his or her unique asthma triggers and ways to avoid them.

Common asthma triggers include:

  • Secondhand smoke from cigarettes, wood-burning stoves and campfires,
  • Pet dander from furry or feathered animals,
  • Cockroaches or cockroach allergen,
  • Dust mites in home furnishings and stuffed toys,
  • Pollen and outdoor pollution,
  • Odors/fragrances from household products to perfumes,
  • Weather extremes,
  • Stress and other emotions,
  • Exercise,
  • Some foods.

Secondhand smoke is especially dangerous. Keep a smoke-free home and car, and avoid other smokers. If you smoke, quit.

Almost any pet can pose a problem. Talk to your child's allergist before buying a pet. If you already have one, ask how to limit triggers, like keeping it out of his or her bedroom.

Thorough cleaning can help with triggers ranging from mold to cockroaches to dust mites living in bedding, stuffed animals and carpeting. Be alert to and indoor odors from paint, cleaning products and fragrances. Exercise, everyday stress and even changes in the weather can bring on symptoms.

Have a written asthma action plan from the that outlines all the steps to take in case of an . A copy should be with the nurse at your child's school or daycare center.

A child's asthma action plan should include:

  • A list of triggers to avoid,
  • Easily understood prescription drug instructions,
  • Emergency contact information for you and all your child's health care providers,
  • Steps to take as soon as symptoms start,
  • Steps to take in a breathing emergency.

Understanding will help ease even a young child's fears.

Explore further: Clean home may help keep kids' asthma in check

More information: Check out the parent and children pages from the American Lung Association for more ideas, including how to identify common asthma triggers and avoid them.

Related Stories

Clean home may help keep kids' asthma in check

October 31, 2016
(HealthDay)—Reducing indoor allergens and pollutants can help control children's asthma, reducing their need for medication, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Teens with asthma almost twice as likely to smoke as their healthy counterparts

November 11, 2016
Curiosity is a driving factor in why most kids start smoking, and the same is true for kids with asthma. A study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting found ...

Working with your school nurse

November 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Nearly 18 percent of kids have a chronic health condition, such as asthma or allergies. If your child is one of them, working successfully with your school's nurse will help keep him or her safe.

Exercising with asthma or allergies

October 20, 2017
(HealthDay)—Allergies and asthma can make exercise more challenging. But if your condition is well managed and you take a few precautions, you should be able to work out without worry.

Kids with asthma that are exposed to secondhand smoke have twice as many hospitalizations

September 24, 2015
The risk for hospitalization doubles for kids with asthma who are exposed to secondhand smoke, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic Children's Research Center.

Eczema plus family history can mean a longer hospital stay for kids with asthma

October 27, 2017
Asthma and allergies are related, and many people who suffer from asthma have allergies that trigger their asthma. Research being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's (ACAAI) Annual Scientific ...

Recommended for you

HIV vaccine protects non-human primates from infection

December 14, 2018
For more than 20 years, scientists at Scripps Research have chipped away at the challenges of designing an HIV vaccine. Now new research, published in Immunity, shows that their experimental vaccine strategy works in non-human ...

RNA processing and antiviral immunity

December 14, 2018
The RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) are intracellular enzyme sentries that detect viral infection and initiate a first line of antiviral defense. The cellular molecules that activate RLRs in vivo are not clear.

The 'greying' of T cells: Scientists pinpoint metabolic pathway behind age-related immunity loss

December 13, 2018
The elderly suffer more serious complications from infections and benefit less from vaccination than the general population. Scientists have long known that a weakened immune system is to blame but the exact mechanisms behind ...

Scientists create most accurate tool yet developed to predict asthma in young children

December 13, 2018
Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have created and tested a decision tool that appears to be the most accurate, non-invasive method yet developed to predict asthma in young children.

New genetic study could lead to better treatment of severe asthma

December 12, 2018
The largest-ever genetic study of people with moderate-to-severe asthma has revealed new insights into the underlying causes of the disease which could help improve its diagnosis and treatment.

Researchers discover unique immune cell likely drives chronic inflammation

December 11, 2018
For the first time, researchers have identified that an immune cell subset called gamma delta T cells that may be causing and/or perpetuating the systemic inflammation found in normal aging in the general geriatric population ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.