Fabric imbued with optical fibers helps fight skin diseases

February 23, 2018 by Bob Yirka, Medical Xpress report
Credit: PHOS-ISTOS-project

A team of researchers with Texinov Medical Textiles in France has announced that their PHOS-ISTOS system, called the Fluxmedicare, is on track to be made commercially available later this year. The system consists of a piece of fabric imbued with optical fibers and a control mechanism. The system is meant to be used for treatment of skin diseases such as acne, psoriasis and actinic keratosis.

The goal of the project was to create a flexible light-emitting textile for use in (PDT) of actinic keratoses—a skin disease characterized by rough patches. The program was initiated in response to requests by people in the medical community looking to replace traditional PDT systems—systems currently in use involve large light panels directed at patients which in addition to treating skin, cause redness and .

The new system works fundamentally the same as current systems—a cream is applied to the skin followed by treatment with light. The light speeds up a reaction between a photosensitizer in the cream and oxygen in the air. The difference is in the light source. Instead of a large panel, optical fibers knitted into a fabric emit enough light to speed up the reaction, but do so without causing pain. After the cream is applied to the skin, the fabric is placed directly on the body over the impacted area.

Fluxmedicare has been undergoing clinical trials at University Hospital, Lille France and at Klinikum Vest in Germany. Dr. Nadege Boucard, a spokesperson for the team working on the project has described it as an unprecedented system for treating skin conditions. He noted also that in addition to effectively treating a wide variety of skin ailments, the new system actually works better because of its wraparound nature. Light is emitted evenly to every part of the body, which, he pointed out, means the beams are homogeneous. A report from the clinical trial team gave an average ranking of pain for the new system of 0 to 1, which Boucard describes as a 90 percent drop. He has further noted that the cost of the system will be approximately €5,000, just a third of those now in use.

Explore further: Vitiligo treated successfully with arthritis drug and light therapy

Related Stories

Vitiligo treated successfully with arthritis drug and light therapy

January 31, 2018
Building on prior research that examined the use of an arthritis medication to treat vitiligo, a team of Yale dermatologists has successfully applied a novel combination therapy—the medication and light—to restore skin ...

Researchers discover why photodynamic therapy for skin cancer can cause pain

June 23, 2016
Severe paleness and photosensitivity are two symptoms of a rare group of hereditary diseases that affect haem, a substance in the blood. While these metabolic disorders - known as the porphyrias - are extremely rare, a similar ...

Topical treatment activates immune system to clear precancerous skin lesions

December 19, 2016
A combination of two FDA-approved drugs - a topical chemotherapy and an immune-system-activating compound - was able to rapidly clear actinic keratosis lesions from patients participating in a clinical trial. Standard treatment ...

E-skin for manipulating virtual objects without touching them

January 22, 2018
A team of researchers from Germany and Austria has developed a type of e-skin that allows a wearer to control virtual objects without touching them. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group ...

Photodynamic therapy vs. cryotherapy for actinic keratoses

August 27, 2014
Photodynamic therapy (PDT, which uses topical agents and light to kill tissue) appears to better clear actinic keratoses (AKs, a common skin lesion caused by sun damage) at three months after treatment than cryotherapy (which ...

Recommended for you

Zombie cells found in brains of mice prior to cognitive loss

September 19, 2018
Zombie cells are the ones that can't die but are equally unable to perform the functions of a normal cell. These zombie, or senescent, cells are implicated in a number of age-related diseases. And with a new letter in Nature, ...

Synthetic sandalwood found to prolong human hair growth

September 19, 2018
A team of researchers led by Ralf Paus of the University of Manchester has found that applying sandalwood to the scalp can prolong human hair growth. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group ...

A new defender for your sense of smell

September 18, 2018
New research from the Monell Center increases understanding of a mysterious sensory cell located in the olfactory epithelium, the patch of nasal tissue that contains odor-detecting olfactory receptor cells. The findings suggest ...

Separated entry and exit doors for calcium keep energy production smooth in the powerhouses of heart cells

September 18, 2018
Stress demands the heart to work harder and faster. To keep pace, the muscle must make its fuel at an accelerated rate. Bursts of calcium entering mitochondria—the cell's powerhouses—normally help control energy output, ...

First gut bacteria may have lasting effect on ability to fight chronic diseases

September 18, 2018
New research showing that the first bacteria introduced into the gut have a lasting impact may one day allow science to adjust microbiomes—the one-of-a-kind microbial communities that live in our gastrointestinal tracts—to ...

Small molecule plays big role in weaker bones as we age

September 18, 2018
With age, expression of a small molecule that can silence others goes way up while a key signaling molecule that helps stem cells make healthy bone goes down, scientists report.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.