Norovirus outbreak in South Korea caused no deaths

February 10, 2018 by The Associated Press
Norovirus. Credit: CDC

A story shared widely online that claims a norovirus outbreak at the Pyeongchang Olympics has led to fatalities is false.

The story on the AmericasFreedomFighters site correctly reported that over 100 people have been infected since Feb. 1 with norovirus, according to the local Olympics organizing committee. About 1,200 people have been sequestered at a youth training center where for the games have been staying. The story's headline falsely states that the outbreak is rare and has a "rapidly rising" death toll.

Norovirus is a common, infectious bug that causes unpleasant symptoms including diarrhea and vomiting but doesn't require medical treatment. No deaths have been reported.

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