Four best practices outlined to prevent health care cyberattacks

February 14, 2018

(HealthDay)—Four best practices outlined that can help prevent health care cyberattacks, which increased from 2016 to 2017, according to a report published in Managed Healthcare Executive.

After conducting a survey, Radware, a firm, obtained 605 responses from companies in various industries and of differing sizes around the world, including the industry. Based on the report, from 2016 to 2017, the care industry saw a rise in the likelihood of cyberattacks, due to the industry's low preparedness levels and valuable confidential data.

According to the report, four practices have been identified to help health care executives better prepare for breaches of cybersecurity. Executives should take the time to perform an audit and identify potential inefficiencies in cybersecurity, including evaluating or developing an emergency response plan. Third parties with whom they partner should be asked about their cybersecurity measures. With the rise of ransomware campaigns that often encrypt data and networks, health care executives should ensure that organizations' systems are regularly backed up. Finally, employees should be educated about basic cybersecurity.

"The health care industry is not prepared to handle today's cyberthreats, even as attacks targeting health organizations rise," Carl Herberger, vice president of security at Radware, said in the Managed Healthcare Executive article. "This report indicates gaps in cybersecurity and gives a guide on where organizations should focus their energy and resources."

Explore further: Cybersecurity fears grow as defenses boosted: study

More information: Abstract/Full Text

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