New research shows shorter fitness test still accurately predicts risk of mortality

February 12, 2018, Queen's University

Queen's University researcher Louise de Lannoy has determined a short, five minute treadmill test can predict the risk of mortality. This risk is determined independent of other traditional risk factors including age, weight, blood pressure, smoking status, diabetes, cholesterol, and family history.

Overwhelming evidence has shown a maximal fitness is a reliable way to determine the risk of mortality. This established test, performed on a treadmill where the maximum incline is steadily increased until the participant cannot continue, isn't commonly used in as it's time-intensive and uncomfortable for the patient.

Ms. de Lannoy's findings show a shorter , called a submaximal fitness test, predicts the risk of similarly to the maximal test. This is an important finding as it provides the clinician with options for assessing the health and risk of their patient.

"This study shows that the risk association with submaximal fitness is similar to that of maximal fitness, which suggests that the submaximal fitness test, which requires less than one-third the time of a maximal fitness test and does not require the patient to reach maximal exertion, is a pragmatic alternative to maximal fitness tests for assessing mortality risk in clinical settings," explains Ms. de Lannoy. "Finally, submaximal fitness predicted above and beyond traditional risk factors, therefore this test provides information that influences and enhances patient management."

To determine the results, the research team used data from a large study of 6,106 men and women, followed from 1974-2002 to look at change in submaximal test performance over time and its relationship to risk of premature death.

Explore further: Low fitness is associated with larger waist size and higher degree of inflammation

Related Stories

Low fitness is associated with larger waist size and higher degree of inflammation

January 17, 2018
Low fitness is associated with a larger waist size and a higher degree of inflammation, according to a study published January 17, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Anne-Sophie Wedell-Neergaard from the University ...

Knowing your fitness number predicts your risk for future ill health

November 17, 2016
It is well known that individuals who are unfit are at substantially greater risk for lifestyle-related diseases and premature death. Despite its high value in assessment of risk, fitness is not routinely measured in clinical ...

Chronic sleep restriction negatively affects athletic performance

June 13, 2016
A new study found that chronic sleep restriction negatively affects athletic performance.

Cardiorespiratory fitness is essential to reduce risk of coronary heart disease

November 17, 2017
Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a leading cause of death for men in the U.S. Both cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and the blood triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein ratio (TG:HDL ratio) are strong predictors of death from ...

No racial difference in prognostic value of cardiorespiratory fitness

April 18, 2016
(HealthDay)—Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) predicts all-cause mortality, with no racial differences in its prognostic value, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Interval training cuts CVD risk in testicular cancer survivors

July 31, 2017
(HealthDay)—For testicular cancer survivors (TCS), a high-intensity aerobic interval training (HIIT) intervention improves cardiorespiratory fitness and reduces cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, according to a study published ...

Recommended for you

Seven percent of children in orthodontic care at 'high risk' for sleep disorders, according to new research

August 21, 2018
A child who is restless, hyperactive and can't concentrate could have a problem rooted in a source parents might not suspect: a sleep disorder.

Simple leg exercises could reduce impact of sedentary lifestyle on heart and blood vessels

August 21, 2018
A sedentary lifestyle can cause an impairment of the transport of blood around the body, which increases the risk of disease in the heart and blood vessels. New research published in Experimental Physiology suggests that ...

If you've got MS, exercise means much more than moving

August 21, 2018
For people with multiple sclerosis, the meaning of exercise stretches way beyond health and keeping fit, shows new research revealing what life's really like with the condition.

Your office may be affecting your health

August 20, 2018
Workers in open office seating had less daytime stress and greater daytime activity levels compared to workers in private offices and cubicles, according to new research led by the University of Arizona.

Healthy diet linked to healthy cellular aging in women

August 20, 2018
Eating a diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains and low in added sugar, sodium and processed meats could help promote healthy cellular aging in women, according to a new study published in the American Journal ...

Sitting for long hours found to reduce blood flow to the brain

August 20, 2018
A team of researchers with Liverpool John Moores University in the U.K. has found evidence of reduced blood flow to the brain in people who sit for long periods of time. In their paper published in the Journal of Applied ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.