Childhood measles linked to increased risk of later lung disease

March 21, 2018, Wiley

In a new Respirology study, having measles—a highly contagious respiratory infection—during early childhood was linked with an increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in middle age, but only in adults with asthma and a considerable history of smoking.

While additional research is needed to confirm the findings, scientists speculate that airway damage from childhood measles may predispose an individual to asthma-like symptoms and increased susceptibility to airway obstruction if they also smoked.

"While we have found measles to not have an effect by itself, our findings suggest that infection in could contribute to COPD when combined with significant asthma and smoking histories," said lead author Dr. Jennifer Perret, of The University of Melbourne, in Australia.

Explore further: Mother's smoking may increase her children's risk of lung disease as adults

More information: Jennifer L. Perret et al, Childhood measles contributes to post-bronchodilator airflow obstruction in middle-aged adults: A cohort study, Respirology (2018). DOI: 10.1111/resp.13297

Related Stories

Mother's smoking may increase her children's risk of lung disease as adults

March 11, 2016
An Australian study that followed patients over five decades reveals that children of mothers who smoke have an increased likelihood of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adulthood.

Researchers ID microbiome genes tied to asthma

November 22, 2017
(HealthDay)—Functional genes in the upper airway microbiome may be tied to childhood asthma, according to a study published Nov. 20 in Allergy.

Early childhood bronchiolitis increases asthma risk in adulthood

November 23, 2015
Persons who have had bronchiolitis in early childhood have an increased risk of asthma at the age of 28-31 and a weaker health-related quality of life than their peers. In lung function tests, they also demonstrate changes ...

Study sheds light on how childhood RSV can lead to asthma

March 2, 2018
Infants who have higher amounts of the bacterium Lactobacillus present in their nose or upper part of the throat during an acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection are less likely to develop childhood wheezing later ...

Prenatal PPI, H2 blocker use linked to asthma risk in child

January 12, 2018
(HealthDay)—Prenatal, maternal, acid-suppressive drug use is associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma, according to a review published online Jan. 11 in Pediatrics.

Recommended for you

A bad influence—the interplay between tumor cells and immune cells

October 16, 2018
Research at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) yielded new insights into the environment surrounding different types of lung tumors, and described how these complex cell ecosystems may in turn ...

New immunotherapy targeting blood-clotting protein

October 15, 2018
Normally, the blood protein fibrin does not enter the brain. But in several neurological disorders, the blood-brain barrier—which keeps large molecules in the blood from entering the brain—becomes abnormally permeable, ...

Function of neutrophils during tumor progression unraveled

October 15, 2018
Researchers at The Wistar Institute have characterized the function of neutrophils, a type of white blood cells, during early stages of tumor progression, showing that they migrate from the bone marrow to distant sites and ...

Immune health maintained by meticulously ordered DNA

October 15, 2018
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have revealed how immune health is maintained by the exquisite organisation skills of a protein called Pax5.

Enzyme that triggers autoimmune responses from T-cells in patients with MS found

October 11, 2018
A team of researchers from Switzerland, the U.S. and Spain has isolated an enzyme that triggers an autoimmune response from T-cells in patients with MS. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, ...

Scientists reveal new cystic fibrosis treatments work best in inflamed airways

October 11, 2018
A new UNC School of Medicine study shows that two cystic fibrosis (CF) drugs aimed at correcting the defected CFTR protein seem to be more effective when a patient's airway is inflamed. This is the first study to evaluate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.