New findings on type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer survival rates

March 16, 2018 by Nana Ohkawa, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Researchers from the University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center and Office of Public Health Studies found that patients who have type 2 diabetes in addition to other chronic diseases have a lower survival rate for colorectal cancer.

A study published in the International Journal of Cancer investigated the survival rates of colorectal with or without type 2 diabetes, and with additional diseases such as heart disease or stroke. The findings showed type 2 diabetes alone does not significantly affect survival for colorectal cancer patients. However, patients with type 2 diabetes as well as other had a lower survival rate.

The researchers looked at 24 years of health data of more than 215,000 adults from California and Hawaiʻi who participated in the multiethnic cohort to identify predictors of survival. Among 3,913 new cases of colorectal cancer, the 707 participants with type 2 diabetes were compared to those without type 2 diabetes.

"The multiethnic cohort is an excellent resource that allows us to study diseases in diverse ethnic groups," said Yvette Amshoff, lead author and education coordinator at the UH Cancer Center. "Relationships between type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer have been studied before, with most studies finding a lower chance of survival of those with both diseases. However, in our study population of Caucasian, African American, Native Hawaiian, Latino and Japanese, only Latinos with a history of type 2 diabetes had worse survival. This shows a possible disparity in healthcare that should be addressed."

Added Andrew Grandinetti, study co-author and associate professor of epidemiology in the Office of Public Health Studies, "The findings that participants with additional diseases and possibly those with long-term type 2 diabetes experience higher mortality are significant to policymakers and health-care providers, because they encourage screening and early detection in colorectal cancer patients to help increase life spans."

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men and third among women in Hawaiʻi. There is an average of 224 deaths from colorectal cancer each year in the state, with an average of more than 700 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the UH Cancer Center's Hawaiʻi Tumor Registry. In the U.S., is the fourth most commonly diagnosed . By 2040, 642 million people worldwide are predicted to have type 2 .

Explore further: Colonoscopy significantly reduces mortality from colorectal cancer in Veterans Affairs study

Related Stories

Colonoscopy significantly reduces mortality from colorectal cancer in Veterans Affairs study

March 12, 2018
Colonoscopy was associated with a 61 percent reduction in colorectal cancer mortality among veterans receiving care through the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system. The reduction was observed for both left- and right-sided ...

Differences in cancer survival by type of insurance

December 4, 2017
(HealthDay)—From 1997 to 2014, improvements in cancer survival were mainly limited to patients with private or Medicare insurance, according to a study published online Nov. 30 in JAMA Oncology.

Insurance linked to black-white survival disparities in colorectal cancer

November 14, 2017
Health insurance coverage differences account for nearly one-half of the black-white survival disparity in colorectal cancer patients, according to a new study. The study, published in Gastroenterology, reinforces the importance ...

African-American women with type 2 diabetes may have higher risk for ER-neg breast cancer

November 15, 2017
Among African-American women, those with type 2 diabetes may have a higher risk of developing estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer.

Type 2 diabetes associated with risk of aggressive breast cancer in black women

November 15, 2017
African American women with type 2 diabetes (often referred to as adult-onset diabetes) are at a greater risk for developing breast cancer.

Thiazolidinediones tied to lower cancer risk in diabetes patients

April 27, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Thiazolidinediones are associated with a lower risk of liver and colorectal cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the May issue of Hepatology.

Recommended for you

Researchers suggest new treatment for rare inherited cancers

July 16, 2018
Studying two rare inherited cancer syndromes, Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists have found the cancers are driven by a breakdown in how cells repair their DNA. The discovery, published today in Nature Genetics, suggests ...

Researchers map 'family trees' of acute myeloid leukemia

July 16, 2018
For the first time, a team of international researchers has mapped the family trees of cancer cells in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) to understand how this blood cancer responds to a new drug, enasidenib. The work also explains ...

Scientists sharpen the edges of cancer chemotherapy with CRISPR

July 13, 2018
Tackling unsolved problems is a cornerstone of scientific research, propelled by the power and promise of new technologies. Indeed, one of the shiniest tools in the biomedical toolkit these days is the genome editing system ...

Products of omega-3 fatty acid metabolism may have anticancer effects, study shows

July 13, 2018
A class of molecules formed when the body metabolizes omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit cancer's growth and spread, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study in mice. The molecules, called endocannabinoids, ...

Looking at the urine and blood may be best in diagnosing myeloma

July 13, 2018
When it comes to diagnosing a condition in which the plasma cells that normally make antibodies to protect us instead become cancerous, it may be better to look at the urine as well as the serum of our blood for answers, ...

Massive genome havoc in breast cancer is revealed

July 12, 2018
In cancer cells, genetic errors wreak havoc. Misspelled genes, as well as structural variations—larger-scale rearrangements of DNA that can encompass large chunks of chromosomes—disturb carefully balanced mechanisms that ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.